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It is the age old question: If you were stranded on an island, what essential items would you bring with you? For Jim and Greg, the answer is definitely music. As often as they can on the show, Jim and Greg choose a track they can't live without and add it to the Desert Island Jukebox.

 


Show #416 - 11.15.13
Jim's DIJ



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Show #415 - 11.08.13
Greg's DIJ

Greg has had the British "folktronica" group The Beta Band on his mind ever since Sound Opinions screened the film High Fidelity at The Music Box Theatre in Chicago. In the film, the song "Dry the Rain" from The Three EPs, gets a big laugh. Greg's also a fan of that song, but he thinks the rest of the band's output has been unfairly ignored. The last track off the same album, "Needles in My Eyes," is another glorious anthem, and it's Greg's Desert Island Jukebox pick of the week.

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Show #414 - 11.01.13
Jim's DIJ

It’s safe to say that few artists did more to establish rock and roll than Lou Reed. In fact, both Jim and Greg said as much in their obituaries of the music legend, who died last week at age 71. He deserves more than just a track in the Desert Island Jukebox, but for this episode, one will have to do. It’s “Candy’s Room,” a song that, Jim explains, highlights Lou Reed’s contributions to Slowcore and his amazing sense of compassion.

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Show #413 - 10.25.13
Greg's DIJ

Talking about Paul McCartney got Greg thinking about one of The Beatles’ longtime friends and contemporaries: Harry Nilsson. Nilsson was especially fond of John Lennon, and the two collaborated on a 1974 album called Pussy Cats. The results, though, were a bit... out there, perhaps because of all the drugs, drink and heartbreak. But that dark mood piqued Greg's interest, and he chooses the song "Black Sails" for a rainy day on the desert island.

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Show #410 - 10.04.13
Jim's DIJ

Not taking any cues from either Greg or the news this week, Jim instead opts to pick an album at random out of his personal collection. With eyes closed, his finger landed on trip-hop group Morcheeba's 1998 album The Big Calm and the song "Part of the Process." The group's early albums were their best, combining elements of spaghetti western and film noir soundtracks with playful musical surprises like this track's country fiddle. The band broke up in 2003, but is now reunited with a promising return-to-form later this month.

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Show #408 - 09.20.13
Greg's DIJ

Jim and Greg continue to inspire one another. Last week Jim chose a track by Australian punk band The Saints (inspired by Greg’s Australian pick the week before). Now this week Greg wanted to continue highlighting an artist who, like The Saints, kept soul music alive. British “Pub Rocker” Graham Parker emerged out of a very white, male scene in the 1970’s. But he also incorporated the Stax and Motown sounds he grew up loving. Greg adds “Pouring It All Out” to the Desert Island Jukebox. And you know who else loves Graham Parker? Judd Apatow and Adam Carolla, to name a few. Pub Rock fans should also check out our interview with Nick Lowe.

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Show #407 - 09.13.13
Jim's DIJ

Last week Greg gave some love to our friends down under and chose a track by the Australian group The Go-Betweens. But, Jim was hoping he’d go right to the band that intro’s this segment: The Saints. So this week he drops a coin in the Desert Island Jukebox and chooses the ultimate anti-advertising song: “Know Your Product” from 1978. And after this, Sound Opinions H.Q. is expecting a free trip to Brisbane.

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Show #406 - 09.06.13
Greg's DIJ

The Australian band The Saints has been ushering in our Desert Island Jukebox segment for years. And this week, Greg wants to stay in that continent and add a song by The Go-Betweens. The band’s series of albums in the ‘80s were wonderful, but never made a big commercial impact. They reformed in 2000 and had one of those rare successful second acts. And it’s from that era that Greg culls his DIJ pick: “Here Comes a City” from 2005.

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Show #405 - 08.30.13
Jim's DIJ

Jim's list of favorite country tunes runs short, but he's got a soft spot for Bobby Gentry’s country-pop crossover hit "Ode to Billie Joe." A story-song about what happened one fateful evening on the Choctaw Ridge and the Tallahassee Bridge, "Ode to Billie Joe" revolves around one central question: what did Billie Joe toss into the river before he killed himself? Stranded on the Desert Island, Jim has plenty of time to ponder that mystery.

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Show #403 - 08.17.13
Greg's DIJ

For his Desert Island Jukebox selection, Greg celebrates the musical legacy of Cowboy Jack Clement, the country music producer, songwriter, and artist who died recently at age 82. Jack made his name at Memphis’s Sun Studios during the 1950’s, recording greats like Jerry Lee Lewis. But it was at Columbia that he helped craft Johnny Cash’s inimitable “Ring of Fire.” The night before the “Ring of Fire” recording session, Cash had a dream about Mariachi trumpets. And he knew just who to turn to make that dream a reality. Greg credits Clement’s horn riff on “Ring of Fire” with the track’s enduring energy and distinctiveness.

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Show #402 - 08.09.13
Jim's DIJ

Jim celebrates pioneering rock critic Mick Farren with his DIJ pick this week. Farren passed away recently at age 69 in true rock ‘n’ roll fashion: onstage performing with his proto-punk band The Deviants. A star correspondent for Britain’s NME, Farren wasn’t content just writing about music; he also made it himself. The Deviants merged Fugs-style primitivism with the psychedelic weirdness of contemporaries like Hawkwind. Jim plays “Garbage”.” from the band’s 1969 debut, Ptooff!, an album that would go on to inspire later generations of UK punks.

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Show #399 - 07.19.13
Greg's DIJ

Greg paraglides into the desert island this week with a nod to his past. Just as Jim recalled a “summer song” last week, Greg remembers listening to AM radio in his parents’ kitchen. The station was playing the 500 greatest songs of all time, and “House of the Rising Sun” by The Animals hit him like a bolt. Many have recorded their own versions, but no one did it like the Animals and vocalist Eric Burdon.‎

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Show #398 - 07.12.13
Jim's DIJ

Jim’s been thinking about “Summer Songs” this season and remembers being 7-years old on the New Jersey boardwalk and hearing “Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey,” by Paul and Linda McCartney. The Ram track is “cheesy,” to be sure, but man did McCartney have a way with hooks. Jim has no idea what the lyrics mean—are they about drugs? WWII?—but the song deserves a place in the Desert Island Jukebox.

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Show #397 - 07.05.13
Greg's DIJ

Memphis garage rockers Oblivians recently released their first record in fifteen years, Desperation. Greg’s had it on heavy rotation along with the group’s post-punk-inspired back catalogue. With two guitars, two chords, and a stripped down drum kit, Greg says Oblivians married punk’s “last moment on earth intensity” with Memphis’s rock ‘n’ roll tradition. He chooses “Viet Nam War Blues” off the band’s 1995 debut album Soul Food for his Desert Island Jukebox pick. It’s a Lightnin’ Hopkins cover about a mother whose son goes off to war. Whereas Hopkins brings a jazzy, poetic sensibility to the track, Greg says Oblivians bring rage.

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Show #396 - 06.28.13
Jim's DIJ

Jim recently made a trip back to his home state of New Jersey and did a lot of driving. So he stumbled upon a classic rock station playing “America” by Simon and Garfunkel. This song never fails to choke him up, even the versions by Yes and Bowie. It deserves a prominent spot in the Desert Island Jukebox.

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Show #395 - 06.21.13
Greg's DIJ

Kanye’s mixed success on Yeezus gets Greg thinking about West’s creative predecessors, and an artist who did anger-filled “industrial rap” even better. Saul Williams’ 2004 self-titled album merged aggressive, minimalist, production with anger-filled rap in a way that got industrial music heavyweights like NIN’s Trent Reznor to pay attention. (Reznor later produced an album for Williams.) Greg plays “List of Demands” for his Desert Island Jukebox as an example of what Yeezus could have been.

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Show #394 - 06.14.13
Jim's DIJ

Until recently, Sonic Youth’s Kim Gordon and Thurston Moore were one of the most visible families in rock. For his DIJ, Jim commemorates the group’s best track (in his humble opinion). “Death Valley ’69” from 1985’s Bad Moon Rising is also about a “family”: the Manson Family. Written by Moore and Teenage Jesus and the Jerks’ Lydia Lunch, the track captures the insanity of Manson’s cult with some pretty insane hooks.

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Show #393 - 06.07.13
Greg's DIJ

It seems that Jim and Greg have been in a progressive rock mood of late, at least when it comes to their trips to the tropical isle. This week Greg looks to Procol Harum, a pioneer in the British prog scene. You of course know this song. But the track that Greg adds to the Desert Island Jukebox is 1969’s “Salty Dog.” It evokes desperation, drama and fear. Amazing considering it began in a bathroom in Cleveland.

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Show #392 - 05.31.13
Jim's DIJ

Jim recently contributed to a new book on Prog Rock, so he’s got the experimental pop of the 1970’s on the brain. And no band from that era is sillier than Emerson, Lake and Palmer. If it could be done over the top, they did it. Take the track “Lucky Man” for example. It features one of rock’s earliest Moog solos and made it possible for keyboard nerds to imagine themselves guitar shredders. So of course, Jim wants to add it to the Desert Island Jukebox.

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Show #391 - 05.24.13
Greg's DIJ

Ray Manzarek’s death gets Greg thinking about bands that have carried The Doors’ dark LA aesthetic into the present day. For his DIJ, he goes with The Warlocks’ 2002 album Phoenix. It wasn’t just The Warlocks’ lyrics that were dark, he says, it was also their music. As many as ten players contributed to the band’s moody, wall-of-sound onstage. The lyrics to “Shake the Dope Out” could be about drugs, but Greg thinks they could also be referring to the overwhelming feeling of the band’s music.

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Show #389 - 05.10.13
Jim's DIJ

Tame Impala’s Kevin Parker wasn’t afraid to declare his love for the admittedly un-hip Supertramp during this week’s interview, and neither is Jim. Jim celebrates the British band’s signature mix of prog and pop during this week’s DIJ. He says “Take the Long Way Home” from 1979’s Breakfast in America is characteristic of the band’s simultaneously sunny and threatening take on orchestral pop.

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Show #388 - 05.03.13
Greg's DIJ

Greg has traveled by “bathysphere” to the desert island to pop a quarter in the jukebox. And right now he’s in a Miles Davis kinda mood. Specifically, Greg has been going back to Davis’ jazz-fusion period and his 1971 release A Tribute to Jack Johnson. He had perfected his studio language with Teo Macero, and you can hear that in just a snippet of the almost half hour track “Right Off.”

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Show #387 - 04.26.13
Jim's DIJ

Jim’s lounging away on his beach blanket thinking about 1994, and he decides to add “Seether” by Vercua Salt to the Desert Island Jukebox. It just so happens that frontwomen Louise Post and Nina Gordon have decided to “bury the hatchet” and reunite. Will their new singles be as good as “Seether?” Only time will tell…

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Show #386 - 04.19.13
Greg's DIJ


A tour and a raft of new reissues have got Greg thinking about Shuggie Otis again. A guitar prodigy, Shuggie got his start in father Johnny Otis’s band at the tender age of fifteen. Just a few years later, he dropped the band gig to explore more avant-garde and atmospheric territory, making some of the most genre-defying guitar music of the seventies. Greats like Al Cooper and Frank Zappa clamored to work with him, but by the mid seventies, Shuggie had largely dropped off the musical map. Luckily, songs like Greg’s DIJ pick, “Strawberry Letter 23” haven’t grown stale with age. Thanks to renewed interest, Shuggie’s back on tour. Listen to Strawberry Letter’s psychedelic glockenspiel and guitar solos, and you might just be inspired to check him out live.
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Show #385 - 04.12.13
Jim's DIJ

Jim’s Desert Island Jukebox selection is inspired by another recent loss. Musical engineer Andy Johns passed away at age 61. As Jim explains, Johns was witness to the recording of some of rock’s great masterpieces, from The Stones’ Sticky Fingers and Exile on Main Street, to Led Zeppelin’s Led Zeppelin II. But for his pick, Jim goes to a personal favorite: the debut album by New York punk rockers Television. “See No Evil” still gets heads bobbing in Chicago clubs, and Jim credits Johns with the track’s intimate drum sound.

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Show #384 - 04.05.13
Greg's DIJ

After a recent experience seeing Emmylou Harris, Greg was reminded of the songwriting talent of the great Townes Van Zandt. Many, including Ms. Harris, have performed his song “Pancho and Lefty,” but it's the Townes original that Greg wants to have with him on the island. The song tells the tale of two men living on the margins of society, and wonders who fares better: Pancho, who is betrayed and left to die, or Lefty, who is left alone “livin in cheap hotels.”

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Show #381 - 03.15.13
Jim's DIJ

Recently, our own Jim’s mood was descending into Bell Jar territory, so his wife told him to “Snap out of it, Sylvia Plath!” So, he looked to another “Sylvia Plath,” to cheer himself up. That would be the 1982 track by Peter Laughner. The Cleveland singer/songwriter worked in the same scene as Pere Ubu, and it’s a welcome addition to the Desert Island Jukebox.

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Show #379 - 03.01.13
Greg's DIJ

Miles Davis has been on Greg’s mind lately, and his revolutionary string of early ‘70s albums(including Bitches Brew, Live-Evil, and On the Corner) have been fixtures on Greg’s turntable for weeks. Miles’ rock and funk explorations can be partially credited to (or blamed on, depending on your point of view) his then wife, Betty Davis. She put out her own series of great records after their divorce. For his Desert Island Jukebox pick this week, Greg turns to the first song on Betty Davis’ 1973 self-titled debut, “If I’m in Luck I Might Get Picked Up.” Betty put together an incredible band of Santana and Sly Stone sidemen (including Larry Graham on bass!), and wrote parts for them that contained more than enough grit and grime to complement her raspy blues roar and bawdy lyrics. Even Prince personally told Greg that he uses this song as a frequent source of inspiration!


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Show #377 - 02.15.13
Jim's DIJ

It’s always sad to hear of a musician passing, but Jim admits that no death has hit him harder in recent years than that of Reg Presley. The Troggs lead singer was no great talent and no great looker, but he was full of attitude. And The Troggs have an entire catalog of great songs….not just “Wild Thing.” So in his honor, Jim adds “I Can’t Control Myself” to the Desert Island Jukebox this week.

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Show #375 - 02.01.13
Greg's DIJ


Greg’s been in a Joni Mitchell phase, and is particularly smitten with the singer/songwriter’s 1976 release For the Roses. Between her folk phase and her avant-jazz phase, she released this record with the track “You Turn Me On, I’m a Radio.” Is it directed towards a romantic figure? Or a record company one? Add that question to the layers of sounds and influences from country to Latin to jazz, and you’ve got one wonderfully complicated song.
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Show #366 - 11.30.12
Jim's DIJ

Jim’s DIJ pick was inspired by an article he read recently in The New Yorker. In spite of a life-long hatred of The Grateful Dead, Jim made it through (and even enjoyed!) Nick Paumgarten’s 25,000 words on the world of Deadhead bootleg tape collecting. No, this critic wasn’t converted to the church of Jerry Garcia, but the article did remind him of some particular nasty punk songs with lyrics about the Dead. His favorite, “Pop Songs” by Suicidal Tendencies, is this week’s addition to the jukebox.

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Show #365 - 11.23.12
Greg's DIJ

For his turn at the Desert Island Jukebox, Greg wants to add a song by one of his favorite “Power Pop” bands. The term was actually coined by Pete Townshend during The Who’s pre-rock opera era. It now describes a slew of bands who use a lot of big melodies, tight arrangements, harmonies and prominent guitar riffs. The Midwest produces a lot of power pop bands, including Green. The band has had many incarnations, but it’s the constant force of Jeff Lescher that gives the group its edge and puts them above the rest for Greg. He takes their song, “She’s Not a Little Girl” with him to the deserted island.

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Show #364 - 11.16.12
Greg's DIJ

5 Soul singer Cody Chesnutt has a new album out, reminding Greg that he’s often left off the list of masterful vocalists. This is clearly evident on his 2002 album The Headphone Masterpiece. In fact, The Roots were such fans they re-worked his song “The Seed” into “The Seed (2.0).” and released it as part of their album Phrenology. Greg takes it with him to the desert island this week.

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Show #363 - 11.09.12
Jim's DIJ

It was movie night recently in Jim’s “Critiquing the Arts” class at Columbia College. He and his students sat down to watch Almost Famous – still the only feature film he knows about rock criticism. The film’s opening number “The Oogum Boogum Song” blew his students away, so this week Jim pays homage to this hidden gem with his Desert Island Jukebox pick. “The Oogum Boogum Song” is the work of R&B singer Brenton Wood, a Compton native and fan of Sam Cooke who narrowly avoided being a one hit wonder with his other hit, “Gimme Little Sign.” Jim puts “The Oogum Boogum Song” alongside other nonsense rock classics like “MMMBop” and “Tutti Frutti.”

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Show #359 - 10.12.12
Greg's DIJ

As the presidential election approaches, Greg’s thoughts turn to the terrific L.A. band X. He picks “The New World,” the leadoff track on the band’s 1983 album, More Fun in the New World, for this week’s DIJ. For Greg, this song perfectly reflects the meaning (or lack thereof) of a presidential election for society’s have-nots. In the song, X takes the perspective of a politically apathetic homeless person. Whoever wins the election, he explains, nothing really changes for those at the bottom of the economic latter. But the song’s narrator doesn’t totally lose hope. In the chorus he urges the politicians of the day: “Don’t forget the motor city!”

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Show #358 - 10.05.12
Jim's DIJ

After Mumford & Sons, Jim was sorely in need of a folk-rock palette cleanser. So for his DIJ he chose one of the great folk rock musicians of all time, Richard Thompson. A founder of Fairport Convention, Thompson went on to make music with his wife, Linda Thompson, and as a solo artist. Like Marcus Mumford, Thompson has a yen for the biblical. But unlike Mumford, he used Bible stories to spine-tingling affect. Case in point, “The Calvary Cross,” a track he recorded with Linda on their 1974 album I Want to See the Bright Lights Tonight. Listen for the drums echoing Jesus’s footsteps as he climbs the hill where he will be crucified.

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Show #355 - 9.14.12
Greg's DIJ

For his DIJ, Greg wants to celebrate the 20th anniversary of Los Lobos’s Kiko. In 1992, grunge acts like Nirvana were shaking up the mainstream, and veteran acts like Los Lobos had to either reinvent or face irrelevance. Kiko, Greg says, was Los Lobos’s answer to grunge’s challenge. The group started out in the seventies playing a fusion of American roots rock and Mexican folk. Kiko saw main songwriters David Hidalgo and Louie Perez moving in a more trippy psychedelic direction, writing lyrics that were so concise, they were almost haiku-like. The band’s new sound only really began to gel however when their label put them in the studio with producers Mitchell Froom and Tchad Blake. Froom and Blake pumped up the distortion and keyboard effects, and suddenly Los Lobos were walking into a new sonic world. Greg says the album’s opening track, “Dream in Blue,” represents the door opening onto that new world. Hidalgo and Perez’s lyrics describe a sleeping child who, as she begins to dream, finds herself entering a realm of unprecedented freedom.

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Show #353 - 8.31.12
Jim's DIJ

Jim’s been thinking a lot about Genesis lately – and no, not the most famous version of the band with Phil Collins on vocals. Before hits like “I Can’t Dance ” Genesis was an unabashedly nerdy prog rock band, and that’s the iteration of the group Jim wants to celebrate with his DIJ pick. 1971’s Nursery Cryme with Peter Gabriel on vocals fit wonderfully into Jim’s teenage world of renaissance fairs, Isaac Asimov, and Dungeons and Dragons. No track embodied the group’s proto-steampunk ethic better than “The Return of the Giant Hogweed.” Gabriel tells the story of a Victorian explorer who discovers the hogweed in Russia. Unaware of the plant’s carnivorous tendencies he brings it back to England to the royal Kew Gardens, where it proceeds to wreak havoc. Listen for Steve Hackett, mimicking the sounds of the murderous plant on his guitar.

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Show #349 - 8.03.12
Greg's DIJ

In honor of Olivia Tremor Control co-founder Bill Doss, Greg drops “Hideway” from the band’s second album, Black Foliage, into the Desert Island Jukebox. Doss died this week at age 43 of unknown causes. Doss was a founding member of the Elephant 6 recording collective, a group of friends from Ruston, Louisiana whose bands Neutral Milk Hotel, The Apples in Stereo, and The Olivia Tremor Control left a potent legacy in the nineties. Using cheap boom boxes and four track recorders, the friends sought to replicate the lush pop sounds of the Beach Boys and the Beatles on a budget. Greg calls The Olivia Tremor Control the trippiest and most psychedelic of the Elephant 6 bands. They were known for their layering of avant-garde sounds and pop melody. The band reunited in 2009 and played a terrific set at the Pitchfork music festival shortly before Doss’s death.

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Show #345 - 7.06.12
Jim's DIJ

It’s all aboard the rock cruise to the desert island. For this week’s Desert Island Jukebox pick, Jim was inspired by Neneh Cherry’s first band, Rip Rig + Panic. They weren’t the only post-punk band in the eighties playing at the intersection of jazz and rock. British band Blue Rondo a la Turk was a fellow traveler. Jim caught their set at the Peppermint Lounge as a kid, and their hit “Me and Mr. Sanchez” became a go-to party record for him. The track not only merges punk and jazz, but adds a pinch of Latin spice.
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Show #344 - 6.29.12
Greg's DIJ

For his DIJ pick, Greg goes with Reggae all-star Jimmy Cliff’s anti-war song “Vietman.” While Cliff’s legacy is sometimes overshadowed by those of Bob Marley and Peter Tosh, Greg says Cliff was instrumental in popularizing reggae in America. Not only did he star in The Harder They Come and pen that movie’s most enduring tracks, he also wrote “Vietnam,” a tune which none other than Bob Dylan called the best protest song ever written. “Vietnam” tells the story of a soldier’s death in two letters home. For Greg, it’s the song that proved once and for all that Reggae was much more than just a fad and a rhythm. This genre was here to stay.

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Show #343 - 6.22.12
Jim's DIJ

Sociologists talk about the concept of a “gateway drug.” For his turn at the Desert Island Jukebox, Jim turns to the singer who was his gateway drug to music. When a six-year-old Jim popped his dad’s old Frankie Laine LP on the record player, he knew music was a mysterious force he couldn’t live without. An Italian-American from Chicago, Frankie Laine remade himself into an icon of the American West. Songs like “High Noon” and “Rawhide” are undeniable cheese, but between Laine’s rich baritone and those horns, you have to buy whatever he’s selling. (And who could forget that scene from The Blues Brothers where the band gets on the good side of a raucous country crowd by playing “Rawhide”?) Jim’s song pick, however, is “Cry of the Wild Goose” - the epitome of Frankie Laine insanity.

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Show #342 - 6.15.12
Greg's DIJ

Still smarting from Jim’s put-down of The Jam during our Best Second Acts show, Greg goes with the mod-rock group’s track “That’s Entertainment” for his Desert Island Jukebox pick this week. From the group’s fifth studio album Sound Affects, “That’s Entertainment” takes its name from a song in the old Hollywood movie The Band Wagon. Greg says the title choice was tongue-in-cheek. For songwriter and vocalist Paul Weller, “entertainment” is walking though his working class British neighborhood, chronicling the ordinary lives of dissatisfied people dreaming of something better. The real sense of empathy comes from Weller’s falsetto voice, says Greg, which combined with Bruce Foxton's harmonies puts the song over the top.

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Show #336 - 5.04.12
Greg's DIJ

Looking at an artist like Sharon Van Etten, one is reminded of how much the music landscape has changed in the past two decades. It’s possible that despite her talent, Sharon wouldn’t have gotten noticed without the help of critics and fans on the internet. Take Lida Husik. Greg explains that in the ‘90s she was every bit as good as singer/songwriters like Liz Phair and Beth Orton. But, without blogs, message boards and social media, she never got her due. Greg can still give Husik a little love by adding her track “Mother Richard” to the Desert Island Jukebox this week.

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Show #332 - 4.06.12
Jim's DIJ

Jim spoke about the French pop group Les Calamités during the SXSW show, and now he has an opportunity to further showcase them. The British press called them better than Bananarama. The American press called them better than The Bangles. However they stacked up, the songs were irrepressible and high energy. In fact reviewing their LP A Bride Abattue, was Jim’s first professional review job, and his editor stole his copy of the record. So to re-appropriate what was rightly his, he adds “Nicolas” to the Desert Island Jukebox.

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Show #329 - 3.16.12
Greg's DIJ

Talking to Nick Lowe got Greg thinking about all things seventies – in particular, Lowe’s work as a producer during that decade. Few people realize Lowe worked with The Damned, the first UK punk band to put themselves on the map (take that Sex Pistols!). Where another producer might have been tempted to clean up the band’s sound, Lowe kept The Damned as dirty and gritty on record as they were live. And nowhere do you hear that better, Greg insists, than on the band’s first single, 1976’s “New Rose.” Rat Scabies’s drums sound huge, and Brian James’s guitar is so distorted it sounds defective. This, Greg says, is what punk sounds like to this day, and Lowe was onto the trend before anyone else.

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Show #327 - 3.02.12
Jim's DIJ

Last month bassist Michael Davis of the legendary Detroit bands the MC5 and Destroy All Monsters died at age 68. So during this episode Jim wants to honor him by adding a 1979 Destroy All Monsters track called “Meet the Creeper” to the Desert Island Jukebox. It features Davis on bass along with Ron Asheton of The Stooges and a lead singer simply called Niagra.

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Show #326 - 2.24.12
Greg's DIJ

Greg celebrates the 20th anniversary of Meantime by Helmet during his turn at the Desert Island Jukebox. It’s an album many people don’t consider much anymore, but it’s one of his favorites from that era. While we often think about grunge and punk coming from the west coast in the 1990’s, Helmet reflects a sharper, harder edged east coast sound. And like many ‘80s and ‘90s acts, they too were swept away by big labels. But, with their major debut Meantime, they didn’t compromise one iota. So Happy Anniversary Helmet fans! We offer you “Unsung.”

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Show #320 - 1.13.12
Jim's DIJ

Jim is always excited by the opportunity to talk about one of his favorite bands: Can. The pioneering German band took that trademark Velvet Underground drone and updated with elements of punk rock. And on its second album Tago Mago, Can was joined by experimental lead singer Damo Suzuki. A 40th anniversary reissue of Tago Mago was released late last year, so Jim adds a classic track from the album, “Mushroom,” to the Desert Island Jukebox.

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Show #319 - 1.06.12
Greg's DIJ

The great Chicago blues guitarist Hubert Sumlin died last month and Jim and Greg didn’t get a chance to send him off with a full obit. With his turn at the Desert Island Jukebox, Greg now has his opportunity. Sumlin was twenty-one years younger than Howlin’ Wolf when he joined the elder bluesman’s band in the 1950s. Wolf was like a father to Sumlin, and Sumlin eventually became his right-hand man. Sumlin was briefly booted from the band in ’56 for playing over Wolf’s vocals (no one plays over the Wolf!), but adapted his style by dropping his pick and plucking with his fingers. This signature style would make him an icon to later guitarists like Clapton and Hendrix. The 1964 track “Killing Floor,” Greg says, is Sumlin at his best—like a second voice in the song.

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Show #314 - 12.02.11
Jim's DIJ

Jim returns to New Orleans for his Desert Island Jukebox selection this week. In addition, there’s an element of psychedelic lunacy on his pick, as there is on Smile. The record is Dr. John’s 1968 release Gris Gris, and the song is “Gris Gris Gumbo Ya Ya.” you’ll never hear anything like it.

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Show #312 - 11.18.11
Greg's DIJ

The Desert Island Jukebox segment is often an opportunity to give love to an artist who doesn’t get enough of it. Prime example? Earth, Wind and Fire. Sure we’ve all heard the hits at weddings. But brothers Verdine and Maurice White were musical geniuses in Greg’s opinion. And one of their strengths was linking the funk of the 1970’s to its roots in Africa. They did this through dress, but also through the use of instruments like the Kalimba. Check out the rhythms in Greg’s choice of the week, “Kalimba Story.”

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Show #311 - 11.11.11
Jim's DIJ

Not to completely dis Lou Reed, Jim decides to present the musician’s softer side during the Desert Island Jukebox segment. Reed has an enviable encyclopedic knowledge of rock and roll, and he showcases his fandom in a recent issue of Rolling Stone. He talks about one of his, and Jim’s, favorite songs: “Save the Last Dance For Me" by The Drifters. The song was co-written by one of Reed’s heroes, Doc Pomus, and Reed schools even our critics by describing the song’s inspiration. Pomus, suffering with Polio, is unable to dance with his wife at his wedding, so he jots down the lyrics on a place card (which was later gifted to Reed). The song became a classic, and one Jim wants to take with him if stranded on an island.

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Show #308 - 10.21.11
Greg's DIJ

It’s Greg’s turn to drop a song in the Desert Island Jukebox, and he chooses to honor Bert Jansch who died recently at age 67. The Scottish folk guitarist can count Neil Young and Jimmy Page among his followers, and his east meets west sound continues to be an influence for a new generation of folk artists such as Beth Orton and Devendra Banhart. Greg chooses the tune “When the Sun Comes Up,” featuring Orton from his 2006 release Black Swan.

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Show #306 - 10.07.11
Jim's DIJ

Sylvia Robinson passed away last week at the age of 75. One half of Mickey and Sylvia, Robinson earns her place in the music history books through her contributions as a businesswoman. She co-founded Sugar Hill Records, which pioneered early hip-hop. To honor Robinson, Jim decides to take one of Sugar Hill’s most significant tracks to the Desert Island Jukebox: “The Message” by Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five. The track demonstrated that rap music could not only get people moving, but could inspire and spread a message.

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Show #302 - 09.02.11
Greg's DIJ

The harmony vocals on Wild Flag’s record inspired Greg to give the backup singer some. And there’s no better backup singing group than The Pips. Everyone, Jim and Greg included, wanted to be as cool as The Pips. Their music with Gladys Knight epitomized what was great about the golden era of soul music—not just sophisticated songwriting, but sophisticated arrangements that were influenced by the call and response style of gospel music. Greg chooses to add their hit song “Midnight Train to Georgia” to the Desert Island Jukebox, which incidentally is an improvement from the original title “Midnight Train to Houston.”

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Show #297 - 08.05.11
Jim's DIJ

Thinking about Amy Winehouse, Jim is reminded of her roots. Clearly she was influenced by singers like Ronnie Spector in the ‘60s. But the link between that era and this one was British singer Mari Wilson. She revived retro and sported a beehive long before Amy. Partly jazz, partly pop and partly camp, Wilson had a string of hits in the U.K. in the ‘80s. Health problems have interfered with her success in recent years, but she did have a comeback album in 2005 called Dolled Up. Jim chooses a track from it called “Running On Sand” to add to the Desert Island Jukebox.

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Show #295 - 07.22.11
Greg's DIJ

Bummed by what he sees as Common’s recent descent into mediocrity, Greg charts a craft for the desert island. He takes us back to the Chicago rapper’s glory days in the early nineties, when he released “I used to love H.E.R.”. SHE – if you haven’t already guessed it – isn’t a woman. She’s a metaphor for the golden age of hip-hop (H.E.R. stands for Hearing Every Rhyme). Common loved that scrappy city kid who grew up to be a beautiful Afrocentric woman in New York City, and he’s disappointed when she goes West Coast and gets corrupted by show biz. There’s more than a bit of irony here. As Greg reminds us, Common’s lament for classic hip-hop is a hip-hop classic.

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Show #294 - 07.15.11
Jim's DIJ

Jim riffs on tUnE-yArDs’ love for African rhythms. It reminds us of yet another Western band to put African beats to its own creative use. This week, it’s the British new wave group Bow Wow Wow. Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood created the band in 1980, but were out a lead singer until they discovered 14-year-old Annabella Lwin working at a dry cleaner and singing along to Stevie Wonder. Jim’s pick, “C30 C60 C90 Go!” makes ample use of the then-popular “Burundi Beat,” a rhythm cribbed from a French anthropologist’s recording of native Burundian percussionists. Tracked down years later, the original Burundian musicians singled out Bow Wow Wow for special props. Sure they stole the beat, but they also gave it a new spin.

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Show #293 - 07.08.11
Greg's DIJ

Jim and Greg sail away to the Desert Island Jukebox, and it’s Greg’s turn to choose a song. He wants to return to the high point of the New York Dolls. They’re still making music today, but it’s nothing Jim and Greg want to remember. Greg goes back to 1973’s “Personality Crisis,” which showcases what was so amazing about the Dolls: Johnny Thunder’s guitar, Syl Sylvain’s pop smarts and David Johansen’s charisma. People called the group “Glam,” but Greg credits them as the 1st punk band, giving way to the Sex Pistols.

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Show #292 - 07.01.11
Jim's DIJ

Jim’s Desert Island Jukebox selection is inspired by his television guilty pleasure: True Blood. While he was disappointed by the season premiere, he loved hearing Neko Case and Nick Cave duet on a cover of “She’s Not There.” But, nothing compares to The Zombies’ 1964 original. It combines beautiful chords and harmony vocals with a dark, sinister undertone. Plus you can’t beat those keys or Colin Blunstone’s vocals.

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Show #291 - 06.24.11
Greg's DIJ

To cap off the show Greg pays tribute to Robert Johnson. The 100th anniversary of the bluesman’s death is this year. And since he died at age of 27, he didn’t get to record much in his lifetime, but became so influential many regard him as the godfather of rock and roll. With his unique vocal and piano performance and complicated narratives, it’s easy to understand why Johnson resonates today. Greg chooses to add the song “If I Had Possession Over Judgement Day” to the Desert Island Jukebox.

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Show #286 - 05.20.11
Jim's DIJ

Last week Jim and Greg talked about Riot Grrrl and played music from that era. But there were a lot of Riot Grrrl adjacent bands that mistakenly get lumped in with the movement. One such group was Babes in Toyland. Led by Kat Bjelland, they were ferocious and full of style and attitude. So much so, that many accuse Courtney Love of ripping the Babes off. Jim thinks their 1992 release Fontanelle is worth another listen, and adds the lead off track “Bruise Violet” to the Desert Island Jukebox.

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Show #279 - 04.01.11
Greg's DIJ

One of Dylan’s motivations for moving to New York was to meet his hero Woody Guthrie. And decades later, Guthrie continues to inspire musicians. In fact, Greg says one of the best performances of Wilco’s entire career is their cover of Guthrie’s tune “One by One” from the 1998 album Mermaid Avenue. And that’s saying something since Greg literally wrote the book. So,“One by One” goes into the Desert Island Jukebox this week.

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Show #276 - 03.11.11
Jim's DIJ

We really do read your letters! Last week a listener commented on our interview with Jac Holzman, saying he’d like to hear more about Paul Butterfield. So this week’s Jim drops a track by the Butterfield Blues Band into the Desert Island Jukebox. In 1966, on an album of the same name, the group recorded the song “East-West” written by guitarist/composer Mike Bloomfield. Bloomfield was influenced by blues, psychedelia, free jazz and Indian raga music. This track in turn influenced everyone from the Grateful Dead and Joe Boyd. It’s a landmark in rock, and it’s goin’ with Jim to the island.

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Show #274 - 02.25.11
Greg's DIJ

The Gang of Four were heavily influenced by the Chicago blues, and perhaps no label better represents that sound than Alligator Records. The label, run by blues fanatic Bruce Iglauer, is celebrating its 40th anniversary. To toast them, Greg adds one of his favorite tracks by Hound Dog Taylor to the Desert Island Jukebox.It’s the stripped down, raw, mood-setting song “Give Me Back My Wig.”

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Show #269 - 01.21.11
Jim's DIJ

Jim gets to pop a quarter in the Desert Island Jukebox this week, and he admits his choice is more about him than the music. He hates moving—especially in January in Chicago. And the boxes and boxes of music books, records, CDs and even cassettes don’t make the task any easier. But on the upside, Jim explains, he could finally set up his turntable again. He christened his new place by throwing on the vinyl of Sticky Fingers by the Rolling Stones, and despite all the stress of moving, everything felt better. Jim even enjoyed the skipping during the album’s second track “Sway,” so he decided to add it to his desert island collection.

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Show #265 - 12.24.10
Greg's DIJ

Greg’s in a stoner rock mood this week, so he adds a song by Kyuss to the Desert Island Jukebox. The band has announced plans to reunite, sans Josh Homme, next year. Greg describes their sound as a particular kind of heavy music that has great melody and could accompany you on a long drive through the desert….or the desert island. So pop “Green Machine” in your stoner van and get going.

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Show #260 - 11.19.10
Jim's DIJ

The life and death of John Lennon has been on a lot of our minds these days, Jim included. He recently watched Nowhere Boy, which depicts Lennon in his teen years. And one of the scenes shows Lennon first discovering a vinyl record by Screamin’ Jay Hawkins. As Jim explains, Hawkins was one of the first people to bring “fear and loathing” to rock and roll. His 1956 track “I Put a Spell on You” is a classic. It was banned from a number of radio stations at the time, but if it was good enough for John Lennon it’s certainly good enough to add to the Desert Island Jukebox.

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Show #259 - 11.12.10
Greg's DIJ

Bruce Springsteen has a new box set out, and while this is of no interest to our own Jersey native (and Bruce-hater) Jim DeRogatis, Greg dove right in. It has numerous cuts from the Darkness on the Edge of Town era that didn’t make the album, and as Greg explains, one of the recipients of Springsteen’s prolific writing was the group Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes. Like Springsteen, they defined the horns-filled, R&B-influenced Jersey Shore sound—not to be confused with the Shore of today. It’s a sound Greg wants with him in the Desert Island Jukebox, so he adds “Talk to Me” by Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes.

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Show #255 - 10.15.10
Jim's DIJ

Jim needs a palette cleanser after that last review, so he plays an example of a case where someone from the literary world went over to the rock world, and it worked. William S. Burroughs collaborated with a number of musicians toward the end of his life. And on Dead City Radio, the beat writer read his work while accompanied by music by the likes of Sonic Youth, Donald Fagan Chris Stein, and best of all according to Jim, John Cale. On “Ah Pook the Destroyer/Brion Gysin’s All Purpose Bedtime Story,” Burroughs read while Cale played, and the two were a perfect match. Therefore Jim takes that track with him this week to the desert island.

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Show #251 - 09.17.10
Greg's DIJ

The last album inspired Greg to go back to the original version of “Compared to What.” Vocalist and jazz pianist Les McCann paired up with saxophonist Eddie Harris at 1969’s Montreux Jazz Festival to record their version of the Eugene McDaniel song. It was first made famous by Roberta Flack, but for Greg, McCann’s take on the anti-Vietnam protest song is the most moving. He adds it to the Desert Island Jukebox.

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Show #249 - 09.03.10
Jim's DIJ

One release Jim is excited about this fall is a reissue of the debut album by Ride called Nowhere. So he chooses a track from it “Vapour Trail” to add to the Desert Island Jukebox. Along with My Bloody Valentine, Ride established the groundbreaking shoegaze sound, proving that it is possible to do something new with guitar, bass and drums. And Jim puts Nowhere up there with Nevermind, even if it never received the same kind of acclaim.

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Show #248 - 08.27.10
Greg's DIJ

Naturally Hawk got Greg jonesing for some Sinatra/Hazelwood. In the ‘60s arranger and songwriter Lee Hazelwood took Nancy Sinatra under his wing and turned her into a feminist icon. While father Frank wasn’t crazy about the relationship, and Greg admits the sound was at times creepy, he really digs tracks like “Some Velvet Morning,” and takes it with him this week to the desert island.

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Show #244 - 07.30.10
Greg's DIJ

It’s Greg’s turn to drop a quarter into the Desert Island Jukebox this week. He has been loving “Rill Rill” by Sleigh Bells recently, and wanted to go back to the source. That song samples “Can You Get to That” by Funkadelic. Their 1971 album Maggot Brain is a classic, combining folk, rock and funk. And, the song’s vocalist Gary “Diaperman” Shider died a few weeks ago at age 56.

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Show #243 - 07.23.10
Jim's DIJ

Jim was in a Britpop mood when he chose this week’s Desert Island Jukebox song. When you think Blur you think Damon Albarn, and when you think Damon Albarn, you might go back to his former lady love Justine Frischmann of Elastica. Incidentally, M.I.A. also ran in circles with Frischmann, and they collaborated on some of her early songs. Elastica broke up by 2001, but before that they released a slew of great pop-rock hits, including “Vaseline.”

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Show #241 - 07.09.10
Greg's DIJ

After talking with Chrissie Dickinson, Greg thought about this own country music epiphany. He got his own guide to the genre from legendary singer Jimmie Dale Gilmore, who formed The Flatlanders with Joe Ely and Butch Hancock. As Greg explains, no one in Nashville was buying the credibility of three Texas “Flatlanders,” but their unique take on roots country went on to be hugely influential, especially to future alt-country acts. Greg chooses “Dallas” from the band’s one and only release More a Legend Than a Band to add to the Desert Island Jukebox.

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Show #236 - 06.04.10
Jim's DIJ

It’s Jim’s turn to add a song he can’t live without to the Desert Island Jukebox this week. He honors iconic actor Dennis Hopper, who died last week at age 74. Hopper not only directed classic movies like Easy Rider, he choose their soundtracks. So for his track, Jim chooses “The Ballad of Easy Rider.” The version in the film features a solo performance by Roger McGuinn of The Byrds, but Jim prefers the version by the whole band.

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Show #235 - 05.28.10
Greg's DIJ

With France in the air this episode, Greg thinks back to one of his favorite French rock acts: Mano Negra. Co-founded by musician Manu Chao, the band deftly combined rock, reggae, afropop, punk and ska. Their track “Mala Vida,” from their 1989 release Puta’s Fever truly gives new meaning to the term “world music,” and it’s a song Greg wants to groove to on the desert island.

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Show #233 - 05.07.10
Jim's DIJ

During The xx interview, the band spoke of their admiration for Aaliyah. This got Jim thinking about the R&B singer, who died in 2001. As he says, she wasn’t the greatest singer, she wasn’t the most original, but she had real charisma and star power. He adds the track “Rock the Boat,” from Aaliyah’s third and final self-titled album.

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Show #231 - 04.30.10
Greg's DIJ

After listening to K’Naan discuss the challenge of fitting into the record industry’s boxes, Greg is reminded of another hard-to-define act—Michael Franti and Spearhead. They combined hip hop, funk and reggae in their 1994 debut Home. To Greg, Franti is one of the great political singers of all time, and he chooses to add the song “Hole in the Bucket,” from Home to the Desert Island Jukebox.

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Show #230 - 04.23.10
Jim's DIJ

Jim has spent the last week looking at images of the volcanic eruption in Iceland and thinking about a way to honor the European nation. Arguably its biggest musical export is Bjork. Jim hasn’t loved her sparse, robotic sound in recent years, but will always remember songs like “It’s Oh So Quiet” fondly. So, he adds his favorite Bjork track to the Desert Island Jukebox.
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Show #229 - 04.16.10
Greg's DIJ

Greg honors Malcolm McLaren in the Desert Island Jukebox segment. McLaren, a central figure in the British punk scene, died last week at 64. He’s best known as the manager of the Sex Pistols, but as Greg explains, he was equally influential in bringing hip hop to the masses. McLaren was exposed to hip hop in the early ‘80s, and was blown away by the beats, art and music surrounding the genre—one that, like punk, centered around urban life and anti-establishment. So, in memory of McLaren, Greg adds a hip hop-inspired song from his first solo album Duck Rock called “Double Dutch.”

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Show #227 - 04.02.10
Jim's DIJ

For his Desert Island Jukebox selection, Jim chooses “Bad Reputation,” a song by girl group-pioneer Joan Jett. A film about Jett’s band The Runaways was just released, but as Jim explains, that band’s identity wasn’t as much about empowerment as it was about their youth and sexuality. Since that time the singer has spent a career trying to distance herself from that, and Jim calls her the godmother of riot girl rock. That attitude comes through in “Bad Reputation,” which we always enjoyed as the Freaks and Geeks theme song.

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Show #224 - 03.12.10
Greg's DIJ

Greg gets to drop a quarter in the Desert Island Jukebox this week, and chooses a Joey Ramone-inspired song. The Ramones singer was a hero to Greg early on, and his punk spirit helped kick start Greg’s writing career. Joey was always a fan of the classic pop songs he grew up on, and when he got the chance late in life, he worked with one of his own heros, Ronnie Spector. The album was one of Joey’s last projects, so to remember him, Greg plays her version of the Johnny Thunder song “You Can’t Put You Arms Around a Memory” as produced by Joey Ramone.

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Show #222 - 02.26.10
Jim's DIJ

For Jim’s Desert Island Jukebox selection this week, he looked to one of his favorite rock-infused films, The Royal Tenenbaums. He describes his favorite scene between Gwyneth Paltrow and Luke Wilson that ends with the Nico track “These Days.” With her perfect “oval” voice, Nico put a spell on everyone from Jackson Browne to Andy Warhol, and Jim is not immune.

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Show #218 - 01.29.10
Greg's DIJ

One of the many rock deaths this month was that of Dannie Flesher, co-founder of Wax Trax! Records. The Chicago based store and later label defined the industrial sound made most famous by Ministry. And it’s where Greg cut his teeth as a music fan. So, for his Desert Island Jukebox selection this week, Greg chooses a cover version of Black Sabbath’s “Supernaut” recorded at Wax Trax! Records. The song is performed by 1000 Homo DJ’s and fellow Wax Trax fan, Trent Reznor, and can be found on the label’s 1994 box set.

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Show #216 - 01.15.10
Jim's DIJ

At the end of the show Jim drops a quarter into the Desert Island Jukebox. He uses his turn at the DIJ to talk about Vic Chesnutt, a musician who died this past Christmas. Chesnutt, who was a paraplegic since the age of 18, was discovered and championed by R.E.M.’s Michael Stipe. As Jim explains, music was like a lifeline for Chesnutt, and one of his favorite albums by the singer/songwriter was 1998’s The Salesman and Bernadette. To honor the Athens, GA musician, Jim chooses to add “Replenished,” a track from that record, to the Desert Island Jukebox.

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Show #210 - 12.04.09
Greg's DIJ

Talking with Dhani Harrison reminded Greg of George Harrison’s often un-sung guitar skills. And one of George Harrison’s biggest influences was Carl Perkins In fact all The Beatles adored Perkins and his rockabilly picking, Mersey beat sound they made famous. So for his Desert Island Jukebox selection this week, Greg wanted to choose a song that referenced the Beatles love of Carl Perkins and Harrison’s terrific guitar work. “Everybody's Trying To Be My Baby” is his tribute to two quiet, talented guys.

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Show #207 - 11.13.09
Jim's DIJ

While reviewing Weezer, Jim was reminded of another alternative era band, Tuscadero. Like Weezer, they debuted in 1994 with a similarly named record called The Pink Album. And like Weezer they wrote songs about adolescence, nostalgia and pop culture. But unlike Weezer, their move to a major label didn’t bring them great success and longevity. Jim considers Tuscadero one of the many lost heros and heroines from alternative ’90s, and he wants to add their track “Leather Idol” to the Desert Island Jukebox.

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Show #206 - 11.06.09
Greg's DIJ

Greg wanted to honor the memory of Morphine frontman Mark Sandman with this week’s Desert Island Jukebox selection. Sandman died a decade ago, and now Rhino has released a two-disc collection of rarities and live tracks. But Greg thinks the band’s “creepy,” low-rock sound is best enjoyed through their studio albums. He loved Sandman’s sense of atmosphere and brilliant lyrics. They can be heard in his pick, “Radar,” from Morphine’s 1995 album Yes.

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Show #204 - 10.23.09
Jim's DIJ

This past weekend Jim was talking with someone about his book on The Velvet Underground. His conversation partner said, “How can you talk about the Velvet Underground without mentioning The Fugs!?” Well, he’s right. The Fugs were hugely influential on the VU, and also paved the way for the “freak folk” acts of today. None were half as freaky as The Fugs, who came from the beat scene of the 1950’s. These writers and musicians made crude, but wonderful protopunk rock, and Jim chooses their track “Frenzy” to take with him to the desert island this week.

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Show #203 - 10.16.09
Greg's DIJ

Greg needs to clear his Christmas palette, so he chooses a worthy holiday song to put in the Desert Island Jukebox. This is one he could listen to all year long. In 1999 the Minnesota trio Low released the Christmas EP. Members of Low are devout Christians, and you can hear the influence of their faith on their music. In “Long Way Around the Sea,” Low strips the song of any mentions of bows and sleighs and gets to the essence of the holiday. To Greg, it’s deliberate, beautiful and something he’d like to listen to if stranded on an island.

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Show #200 - 09.25.09
Jim's DIJ

Usually Jim and Greg are inspired by something in the show or something in the news for their Desert Island Jukebox picks. But this week Jim is inspired by nothing more than a desire for an injection of high energy rock. He chooses a song by Australian garage rockers the Lime Spiders. Jim thinks their 2nd single “Out of Control” is one of the best garage revival songs he’s ever heard, and that’s why he can’t live without it.

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Show #198 - 09.11.09
Greg's DIJ

For his turn at the Desert Island Jukebox, Greg wants to add a song by one of his favorite “Power Pop” bands. The term was actually coined by Pete Townshend during The Who’s pre-rock opera era. It now describes a slew of bands who use a lot of big melodies, tight arrangements, harmonies and prominent guitar riffs. The Midwest produces a lot of power pop bands, including Green. The band has had many incarnations, but it’s the constant force of Jeff Lescher that gives the group its edge and puts them above the rest for Greg. He takes their song, “She’s Not a Little Girl” with him to the deserted island.

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Show #191 - 07.24.09
Jim's DIJ

It’s Jim’s turn to add a song he can’t live without to the Desert Island Jukebox. To honor the 40th anniversary of the moon landing, he chooses “Ghosts of American Astronauts” by the Mekons. Jim was initially daunted by the Chicago punk/alt-country band. They’ve been going for 3 decades, so where do you start? So Good It Hurts was the doorway for him, and he discovered how smart, political and also seductive they can be on songs like “Ghosts of American Astronauts.”

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Show #189 - 07.10.09
Greg's DIJ

Maxwell got Greg in the mood for some of that great soul music from the late ‘70s era. For him the British group Hot Chocolate stands out from the rest. They had a big hit with “You Sexy Thing,” but that track doesn’t do them justice. Hot Chocolate came out of the ska and reggae tradition that emphasized great storytelling. You can hear this on the song “Emma,” Greg’s Desert Island Jukebox addition for this week.

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Show #182 - 05.22.09
Jim's DIJ

Jim and Greg’s choices for the Desert Island Jukebox are often influenced by current events or discussion in an episode. But this week, Jim just wanted to hear some Buzzcocks. Their album Singles Going Steady is one of the great compilation albums of all time. But the one great single that didn’t make it on is the band’s 1979 song “I Believe.” Is it a manifesto? Or just a joke? Jim doesn’t know, but he’ll be happy listening over and over again.

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Show #180 - 05.08.09
Greg's DIJ

To cap off the show, Greg adds a track to the Desert Island Jukebox. Last week he played Nirvana’s live version of “Where Did You Sleep Last Night?” This week he wants to highlight another great song from that Unplugged set: “Jesus (Don’t) Want Me For a Sunbeam.” It was written by the Scottish duo The Vaselines. The band has headed out on a new US tour and re-released their acclaimed 1992 album The Way of the Vaselines. Both are excellent opportunities to take another look at one of Greg, and Kurt’s, all-time favorite songs.

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Show #173 - 03.20.09
Jim's DIJ

Jim’s Desert Island Jukebox pick was inspired by a documentary he saw on the summer of ’68. He saw the footage of the riots in Chicago during the Democratic Convention in a whole new light because of the reporting he’s been doing on the city government’s attitude toward live music. The city council is attempting to pass legislation that would severely hinder local promoters. And Jim couldn’t help compare the image of our current mayor to that of his father screaming, yelling and proclaiming himself “the law.” That image was juxtaposed with the Stevie Wonder song “Heaven Help Us All,” and Jim thinks it’s a perfect choice to bring with him to the desert island.

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Show #171 - 03.06.09
Greg's DIJ

Recently Greg’s been thinking about whatever happened to soul singer D’Angelo. He made what Greg would consider a masterful album in 2000. Voodoo put D’Angelo at the heart of the Neo soul movement, but that’s the last we’ve heard from him. Greg can’t explain the disappearance, but he can relive the singer’s glory days with this week’s Desert Island Jukebox song “Devil’s Pie.”

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Show #170 - 02.27.09
Jim's DIJ

As discussed earlier, U2, and countless other artists, turn to Brian Eno as a producer. For this week’s Desert Island Jukebox pick, Jim wanted to illustrate why. Eno is a magician in the studio. He turns one sound into another and the result is pure joy. You can hear this in Eno’s 1975 song “St. Elmo’s Fire” from Another Green World.

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Show #169 - 02.20.09
Greg's DIJ

Fleetwood Mac has reunited for another tour, inspiring Greg’s Desert Island Jukebox pick this week. While most people think of Lindsay Buckingham or Stevie Nicks, Greg’s favorite incarnation of Fleetwood Mac was the earliest, with British blues guitarist Peter Green. An idol to peers like Eric Clapton, Green heavily influenced heavy metal musicians. But, he was also hit hard by LSD use. According to Greg, you can hear Green’s descent into madness, as well as his guitar skills, in this week’s DIJ song, Fleetwood Mac’s “Green Manalishi.”

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Show #167 - 02.06.09
Jim's DIJ

Last week Greg marked the anniversary of Buddy Holly’s death with his Desert Island Jukebox. This week Jim honors another important anniversary: the release of Tone-Loc’s Loc-ed After Dark. Tone-Loc may not be who you immediately think of when you go through the names of important hip hop artists, but Jim insists that his gravelly voice over that Van Halen riff are the perfect combination. And, his take on “Wild Thing,” is as great as The Troggs’.

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Show #166 - 01.30.09
Greg's DIJ

This week Greg adds a track to the Desert Island Jukebox. He uses his turn at the DIJ to mark the anniversary of the death of Buddy Holly. Holly, along with The Big Bopper and Ritchie Valens died in 1959. It was a momentous date in rock history, and in his short life, Holly was hugely influential. Greg describes how the singer and guitarist laid a blueprint for what we know today as rock and roll. One of Holly’s most influential recordings is “Well....All Right,” the song Greg chooses to add to the Jukebox. It’s an intimate, stripped down production, and as you listen Greg thinks you’ll hear the roots of albums like Rubber Soul.

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Show #161 - 12.26.08
Jim's DIJ

The final Desert Island Jukebox pick of the year goes to Mr. DeRogatis. Both Jim and Greg had the pleasure of seeing Neil Young on his recent tour. Jim explains that there has never been a Young misstep live, such is not the case with his recordings. In particular, he was not originally a fan of the1992 album Harvest Moon. But now he’s motivated to give the album and its track “Unknown Legend” a second look. This shift was partly inspired by the use of the song in the new Jonathan Demme film Rachel Getting Married. Lead actor (and TV on the Radio frontman) Tunde Adebimpe sings “Unknown Legend,” as part of his character’s wedding vows, and Jim came to realize that it’s a classic tune in the vain of other Young greats.

Show #156 - 11.21.08
Greg's DIJ

One of the things Greg admires most about Alejandro Escovedo is his ability to choose great covers to perform. He reminds his new audiences of great older songs they might not be familiar with. One such song is “Sex Beat” by the Gun Club. The track was released on the California post-punk outfit’s 1981 debut Fire of Love. Greg describes front man Jeffrey Lee Pierce as a legendary figure of that era and genius guitar player. Put a quarter into the Desert Island Jukebox this week to hear his song “Sex Beat.”

Listen to this DIJ: (link)

Show #152 - 10.24.08
Jim's DIJ

Sound Opinions listeners know that one of Jim’s favorite bands of all time is Wire. The punk heroes just wrapped up their tour in support of their most recent album Object 47. Jim was there at the Metro in Chicago to witness the show, and marveled at how much the band fights against nostalgia, especially compared to other bands from the punk era. Wire is all about moving forward, but Jim still likes to look back now and again. He uses this week’s turn at the Desert Island Jukebox to throw in the classic Wire track “The 15th.”

Show #148 - 09.26.08
Greg's DIJ

The Desert Island Jukebox pick this week marks another passing of a musical great. Legendary drummer Earl Palmer passed away this week at the age of 83. Like Buddy Harman who was discussed on the show a few weeks ago, Palmer was an unsung hero. Greg credits him with establishing the sound he defines as rock and roll. You can hear this primitive, brutal style of early rock in the Little Richard track “Ready Teddy.”

Show #146 - 09.12.08
Jim's DIJ

Jim is more excited about this next segment. He thinks there are a number of bands from the alternative era that don’t get their due, including Zuzu’s Petals. Lead singer Laurie Lindeen recently wrote a book about her life on the road called Petal Pusher: A Rock and Roll Cinderella Story. Jim recommends it, but mostly likes to remember the band through its music. That’s why their track “Cinderella’s Daydream” gets added to the Desert Island Jukebox this week.

Show #144 - 08.29.08
Greg's DIJ

Buddy Harman, one of music’s great drummers, died this week at the age of 79. Greg explains that Harman was to Nashville what Benny Benjamin was to Detroit or what Hal Blaine was to Los Angeles. He helped define that sound and played on over 18,000 albums. Drumming wasn’t even a major part of country music prior to Harman’s residency. Just consider what “Pretty Woman” would be without that drum beat. In honor of Harman’s passing, Greg chooses to add Elvis Presley’s “Little Sister” to the Desert Island Jukebox this week. In addition to proving that Presley still had the chops after his stint in the military, the song showcases Harman’s terrific drumming.

Show #143 - 08.22.08
Jim's DIJ

While Jim doesn’t dig the Jonas Brothers, he’s certainly not anti-bubblegum pop. His favorite band in the genre is The Monkees, a group who was manufactured as an “American Beatles,” with their own TV show. “Head”, their self-made movie, presented a different image from the cute, harmlessness one their TV show portrayed. At the time they made the movie, the band members were experimenting with psychedelics and a little more musically inspired. The opener is “The Porpoise Song”, a classic, albeit drug-inspired, bubblegum pop song, and it is Jim’s latest Desert Island Jukebox pick.

Show #134 - 06.20.08
Greg's DIJ

Greg’s DIJ selection this week was inspired by his discussion with Professor Lawrence Lessig. Thinking about fair use, free culture and digital copyright law got this rock critic downright nostalgic for the days when great art was made using other people’s art. “Eggman” by the Beastie Boys is a perfect example of this. The song was released Paul’s Boutique, the hip hop trio’s follow-up to their successful, albeit frat boy-ish, debut License to Ill. The group linked up with production team The Dust Brothers to create a sonic collage of samples, beats, loops and raps. In “Eggman” alone, astute listeners can hear parts of the songs Superfly and Bring the Noise, bits of dialogue from Taxi Driver and E.T., as well as the film scores to Jaws and Psycho. Sadly, shortly following the release of Paul’s Boutique, a series of lawsuits made sampling on this level too risky and too cost-prohibitive. Listening to “Eggman” is enough to send a music fan into mourning. Thankfully the Desert Island Jukebox will keep it safe for posterity.

Show #131 - 05.30.08
Jim's DIJ

It’s rare that Jim and Greg look to their children for critical expertise, but Jim was recently impressed by his 11-year-old daughter. While practicing for her school’s Broadway revue, she noted that The Coasters’ version of “Yakety-Yak” is far superior to that in Smokey Joe’s Café. And indeed, she is right. Jim chooses to add the 1958 song to the Desert Island Jukebox. He explains that songwriter Jerry Leiber of the team Leiber and Stoller thought of the song as “a white kid’s view of a black person’s conception of white society.” Pretty heady for a doo-wop song, and perfect for desert island contemplating.

Show #129 - 05.16.08
Greg's DIJ

This week Sound Opinions welcomed a new station—WHDD-FM, in Sharon, CT. Hotchkiss School in nearby Lakeville produced John Hammond, one of the most important music industry figures in the 20th century. So Greg decided to take his turn at the DIJ as an opportunity to honor the man who discovered Count Basie, Billie Holiday, Bob Dylan, and even Bruce Springsteen. But it was his signing of Leonard Cohen at Columbia Records that Greg wants to highlight. It was brave of Hammond to bring the Canadian poet to the label. His first album Songs of Leonard Cohen, never achieved much commercial success, but it served as inspiration for Robert Altman’s 1971 film McCabe and Mrs.Miller. Greg chooses to add that album’s track “Sisters of Mercy” to the Desert Island Jukebox.

Show #128 - 05.09.08
Jim's DIJ

Jim uses his turn with the Desert Island Jukebox to pay homage to a man who changed the face of rock and roll. Albert Hofman, the Swiss chemist who discovered LSD, died last week at the age of 102. After LSD hit the music scene, bands that were once R&B and pop, became experimental, psychedelic acts. One of the best examples of rock’s psychedelic era is Tomorrow. Jim always interpreted their song “My White Bicycle,” as a tribute to Hofman’s famous bike “trip,” and he thinks that listening to the tune is the best way to remember the scientist. Read Jim’s obituary here.

Show #124 - 04.11.08
Greg's DIJ

The Breeders’ home state of Ohio inspired Greg’s Desert Island Jukebox song choice this week. One of his favorite bands to emerge from the “fly-over territory” is Pere Ubu. Greg describes their unique sound as avant garage—art rock combined with garage rock. But, the band created their own scene and didn’t care what categories they did or did not belong to. In fact, even though they set a template for punk and post punk music, front man David Thomas denies the band has any relationship to punk. According to Greg, the best example of their sound is in the song “Final Solution,” this week’s DIJ addition. When the band was on Sound Opinions they also performed “Final Solution” live. You can listen to that performance and their entire interview here.

Show #123 - 04.04.08
Jim's DIJ

For his Desert Island Jukebox pick, Jim wanted to play a song by an artist that epitomizes “high fidelity.” He looked to a member of his holy triumvirate of rock—Pink Floyd, Genesis and Yes. This week it’s Yes’ turn. Jim describes their version of “America” as a “headphone classic.” While you won’t be able to hear the original vinyl audio fidelity on the radio or podcast, Sound Opinions H.Q. hopes you enjoy this cover of a classic Simon and Garfunkel song.

Show #122 - 03.28.08
Greg's DIJ

Greg’s Desert Island Jukebox pick this week was inspired by the odd, but successful, pairing of Gnarls Barkley members Cee-Lo Green and DJ Danger Mouse. He believes that the tension between opposites can often make for great rock music, even if it doesn’t lead to longevity. An example of this good tension can be heard in the music of the Pixies. Black Francis’ “serial killer vocals” mixed with Kim Deal’s beautiful harmonies created a sound that was both punk and pop. And one of Greg’s fondest concert memories is of the band reuniting in 2004 to perform “Where Is My Mind.” That’s why he decided to take the original version with him to the Desert Island Jukebox.

Show #118 - 02.29.08
Jim's DIJ

While Jim was home sick last week he gave some thought to great songs about fevers. He came up with “Burning For You,” by Blue Oyster Cult and decided to add it to the Desert Island Jukebox this week. Jim describes Blue Oyster Cult as the thinking man’s heavy metal band of the ‘70s. In fact, the lyrics to this song were written by rock critic Richard Meltzer. There are a number of interpretations, but for Jim it was the perfect antidote to his ills.

Show #117 - 02.22.08
Greg's DIJ

It is Greg’s turn to pop a quarter into the Desert Island Jukebox, but this week he had a hard time choosing just one song. According to our host, hip hop star Missy Elliott is the top singles artist of the last 10 years. Along with producers like Timbaland, she makes truly avant-garde music, but does so in a really fun, accessible way. Therefore, it’s no wonder that her songs are hits critically and commercially. For this week’s show, Greg went with the song “Work It.” The song demonstrates Missy’s novel approach to sounds and words. It isn’t really about anything new, but the lyrics, beats and sounds (note the elephant’s wail) couldn’t sound fresher. In fact, only Missy Elliott could get away with having the hook to a Top 40 hit be sung backwards. So, you may not be able to sing along to this week’s DIJ, but you’ll certainly want to.

Show #115 - 02.08.08
Greg's DIJ

Night Ripper is one of Greg’s favorite albums of recent years, but it wasn’t his first exposure to sample-based music. There has been a long tradition of collage music, and one of the artists taking it to the “nth degree” is Osymyso. The UK DJ create a mind-blowing, 12-minute composition called “Intro-Inspection,” which is completely full of unauthorized samples. The song isn’t available for sale anywhere, but you can check it out on the web and on the Desert Island Jukebox.

Show #114 - 02.01.08
Jim's DIJ

Jim gets to add a track to the Desert Island Jukebox this week, and he decided to pick a song from an art school band that got it right. The Talking Heads were the originators of this style, and their song “Life During Wartime,” is one of the first times they incorporated African rhythms and instruments into their New Wave sound. There are layers of percussion and a funky bass line, but the lyrics also deserve to be highlighted. Many listeners probably know the song as a catchy pop track, but it’s also got a heavy message about race riots and a society in trouble.

Show #111 - 01.11.08
Greg's DIJ

Greg gets the first Desert Island Jukebox pick of 2008. Inspired by the collaboration between Marketa and Glen, he started thinking about other songwriting teams in rock history. Most bands have one central songwriter, or perhaps a team, but very few have more than one person contributing their own songs. One of these exceptions is the band Lush. The U.K. band came out of the shoegazer scene of the late ‘80s/early ‘90s, but didn’t get as much attention as their peers. Songwriters Miki Berenyi and Emma Anderson created a sound that Greg desribes as falling somewhere between My Bloody Valentine and the Cocteau Twins. The fragile female vocals paired with a cyclonic gust of guitars can be best heard in the track, “De-Luxe,” from the band’s 1990 album Gala.

Show #103 - 11.16.07
Jim's DIJ

This week it's Jim's turn to drop a quarter in the Desert Island Jukebox. Jim was inspired by a news story that broke this week, in which the seminal UK band, My Blood Valentine announced that they were reuniting. Valentine put out a record in 1991 that Jim called simply "one of the best songs ever." The warbling vocals combined with the ectasy inspired song makes My Bloody Valentine's song, "Only Shallow", this weeks DIJ pick.

Show #100 - 10.26.07
Greg's DIJ

According to Greg, Jim hit the nail on the head with his Led Zeppelin III reference. That’s exactly where he went for this week’s Desert Island Jukebox pick. The band was often misunderstood and merely a hyper-masculine rock act. They had a substantial reflective side, and that’s evident on III. Plant was also wrongly categorized as simply a “banshee screamer.” He could also be subtle, conversational and moving. You can hear the softer side of Zeppelin in Greg’s DIJ choice, “Tangerine.”

Show #99 - 10.19.07
Jim's DIJ

Jim took his turn at adding a track to the Desert Island Jukebox as an opportunity to hear more Neil Young. He chooses “Powderfinger” from Young’s 1979 album Rust Never Sleeps. As Jim explained in the review segment, many of Young’s best songs were on the original, never-released Chrome Dreams, and “Powderfinger” is one of those songs. He considers it a standout in the musician’s career for two reasons: the powerful, emotional guitar-playing and the fascinating, albeit enigmatic, lyrics. However you interpret the song, Jim is certain it’s one you’ll want with you on a deserted island.

Show #98 - 10.12.07
Greg's DIJ

The Annie Lennox review prompted Greg to think about other UK soul singer. Of course there’s Amy Winehouse now, but the mother of them all was Dusty Springfield. Many people know Dusty for her song “Son of a Preacher Man,” which was featured in the movie Pulp Fiction. But, the track Greg wants to take with him to the desert island is “The Look of Love,” which was written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David. For Greg it highlights Dusty’s subtle sexy voice, one that is almost doing a duet with the saxophone. And it also summed up, at one time, what Greg thought marriage was going to be all about – lust, romance and glamorous hair.

Show #94 - 09.14.07
Jim's DIJ

It’s Jim’s turn to pop a quarter in the desert island jukebox. Mr. Kot is pleasantly surprised as Jim reveals his choice - “Credit in the Straight World” by the Young Marble Giants from their 1980 album Colossal Youth. Elements from this late 1970’s post punk band are heard in orchestral pop bands such as Belle and Sebastion. Even Courtney Love’s Hole covered this song on their 1994 release Live Through This The Young Marble Giants consisted of female vocalist Alison Statton and brothers Philip and Stuart Moxham. They went against the English punk grain at the time by choosing to be quiet and minimalist. The band reunited this past May at England’s Hay festival for the first time in 27 years.

Show #93 - 09.07.07
Greg's DIJ

The Mekons 30-year run is an impressive one, especially when you consider that the dominant story in rock is one of instant and fleeting fame. An example of this is the Johnny Burnette Rock ‘N Roll Trio, the band behind Greg’s Desert Island Jukebox pick this week. The Memphis trio comprised of the Burnette brothers and their friend Paul Burlison only had one recording session in the mid-50s, but for that brief period they were all the rage. Johnny Burnette was Elvis and then some, and Burlison had a completely unique and groundbreaking guitar style. You can hear this on the song “Train Kept A-Rollin',” a Tiny Bradshaw-penned tune, that has since been covered by everyone from Led Zeppelin to Aerosmith to Motorhead. But it’s The Johnny Burnette Rock ‘N Roll Trio version that deserves a slot in Desert Island Jukebox.

Show #89 - 08.10.07
Jim's DIJ

It’s Jim’s turn to pick a track for the Desert Island Jukebox. Still on a high after seeing Daft Punk perform at Lollapalooza, he chooses a song by the French electronica duo. In fact, if you haven’t heard the group’s original, you may have heard it being sampled in Kanye West’s new single “Stronger.” The track is “Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger,” and it’s also based on a sample—“Cola Bottle Baby” by Edwin Birdsong.

Show #88 - 08.03.07
Greg's DIJ

Greg chooses a Desert Island Jukebox track this week. Taking inspiration from the Effigies’ visit, he picked a song from the Chicago punk scene of the 1980’s. Naked Raygun was one of the band’s that really got national attention, partly because of their intense live set, and partly because of their emotionally charged songs. Greg chooses one such song, “Home of the Brave,” to take with him to the deserted island. In the song, the band plays three terse verses about the outrage they experienced during the Reagan administration. The song asks the listener to think about what it really means to be the “home of the brave,” and both Jim and Greg are amazed at how appropriate the song’s lyrics still are today.

Show #85 - 07.13.07
Jim's DIJ

To conclude this week, it’s Jim’s turn to drop a track into the Desert Island Jukebox. Jim becomes a bit nostalgic and recalls fond teenage memories of the thriving music scene of Hoboken, New Jersey, the hometown of classic power-pop outfit, The Bongos. Taken from the seminal album, Drums Along the Hudson, which has just been reissued, the track “The Bulrushes” connotes a “messianic” rock and roll coming of age. Jim calls this “The Catcher in the Rye” of power-pop, and an essential choice in his Desert Island Jukebox.

Show #77 - 05.18.07
Greg's DIJ

A lot of people, including Jim and Greg, have brought up Bob Dylan’s The Basement Tapes when discussing Sky Blue Sky. Dylan and The Band recorded those songs in upstate New York in 1967 after Dylan retreated from music. The musicians gathered in the basement of a house they called “Big Pink” and started jamming, much as the men of Wilco did in their practice space on Chicago’s Northwest side. Dylan describes the kind of music they played as something you can sit down to play, but also something that makes you lean forward a little. It’s subtle an intimate, but not without a sense of urgency and passion. You can really hear this in the song, “This Wheel’s On Fire,” making it Greg’s Desert Island Jukebox pick for this week.

Show #76 - 05.11.07
Jim's DIJ

This week's show concludes with Jim’s Desert Island Jukebox pick. Reviewing Tori Amos’ new album got Jim thinking about other artists who have used characters in their performances and albums. One of the people who has done it best is Peter Gabriel. Gabriel assumed different identities throughout his time with Genesis. But it was on his third solo album that Gabriel really let the schizophrenia rip. In the song, “No Self Control,” Gabriel sings from the perspective of an insane man in an asylum. We don’t know what crime he’s done, nor do we know violent act he’s poised to do, but the lyrics as well as the music definitely give the listener a sense of chaos and paranoia. Part of that atmosphere can be attributed to the innovative drumming. Gabriel enlisted former Genesis mate Phil Collins and Jerry Marotta to give the drums a heavy bottom and not use any cymbals. Instead they used a Gate, an electronic device developed by Hugh Padgham. The sound was incredibly influential, and for that reason the drum geek in Jim wants it with him on the deserted island.

Show #72 - 04.13.07
Greg's DIJ

This week Greg drops a track into the Desert Island Jukebox. Coming off of the Kings of Leon discussion, he goes back to Southern rock’s roots and chooses a song by the real kings of the genre—Lynyrd Skynyrd. He describes them as one of the most misunderstood bands of all time. Dismissed as just that bunch of yokels who sang “Freebird,” Greg doesn’t think they get the credit they deserve. Ronnie Van Zant, the original lead singer, and other members of the band died in a plane crash in 1977. But before that, he was able to lend a subtle sophistication to Skynyrd that other, blusier southern rock outfits didn’t have. The track that best illustrates this is “Saturday Night Special.” The song is an eloquent bit of social commentary about the dangers of guns—not the sort of thing you expect these folks to sing about. And unfortunately, not the sort of song that gets requested at live shows.

Show #71 - 04.06.07
Jim's DIJ

It’s Jim’s turn to select a song to take with him to the desert island this week. His DIJ pick was inspired by the two albums reviewed in the show. Amy Winehouse considers herself a modern day Nina Simone, and Timbaland uses a Nina Simone sample in his song “Oh Timbaland.” Jim is in favor of referencing the past, but wanted to go back to a band that was able to bring a hip hop attitude to classic 60s soul and jazz much more successfully than Winehouse ever could. That band is Portishead. Portishead came out of England during the 1990’s as part of the “trip-hop” movement. While their tenure was short (though word is they are making music again), Jim is still impressed by the group’s ability to merge American hip hop with British psychedelia with early soul and R&B. The album he urges listeners to go back to is 1994’s Dummy, and the track he wants to add to the Desert Island Jukebox is “Sour Times.”

Show #66 - 03.02.07
Greg's DIJ

Now it’s time for Greg to add a track to the Desert Island Jukebox. Inspired by last week’s Oscar Awards, he chooses a song by film score composer Ennio Morricone. As a music critic, he’s always baffled by the songs that are honored by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. But, he was happy to see that the broadcast featured a tribute to Morricone. The composer is best known for providing scores for “spaghetti westerns.” While he was based in Rome, with no knowledge of the Old West, Morricone’s music was still evocative of that time and place. Greg credits the fact that many of these films were similar to Italian operas—biblical stories with larger than life characters. Morricone’s music is definitely theatrical, and more importantly, cinematic. Indeed if you listen to the theme to the classic The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, you can picture the landscape and understand the story without even opening your eyes.

Show #65 - 02.23.07
Jim's DIJ

Jim’s Desert Island Jukebox pick is an act of punk rebellion. One of his favorite singles, “Everybody’s Happy Nowadays” by the Buzzcocks, has been co-opted by AARP (American Association of Retired Persons) for their recent ad campaign. AARP has been trying hard to attract younger people, but they seem to have missed the point of the song. It’s an ironic statement on how crummy life can be, rather than a celebration of getting older and retiring. In an effort to reclaim this great track, Jim steals it away to his deserted island.

Show #62 - 02.02.07
Greg's DIJ

It’s Greg’s turn to pop a coin into the Desert Island Jukebox this week. He recently saw a performance by Chicago band the Chamber Strings, and was reminded of how great the band is. They released two great albums in 1997 and 2001 before frontman Kevin Junior’s decent into drug addiction and eventually, homelessness. After working with a doctor, Kevin eventually started on the road to recovery, and now, Greg reports that the band is working on new material. But, our host cannot wait that long, and wanted to hear some Chamber Strings on the deserted island as soon as possible. He chooses, “Make It Through the Summer,” from their album Month of Sundays.

Show #58 - 01.06.07
Jim's DIJ

For his first Desert Island Jukebox pick of 2007, Jim makes a surprising choice. Inspired by Nas’ use of the song in his latest single “Hip Hop is Dead,” Jim decides to go with the epic rock track “In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida” by Iron Butterfly. Not many music critics will defend this song, but Jim stands by it—the single version that is. He can’t defend the 17-minute album version with an unnecessary drum solo. There are rumors that “In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida” was supposed to be “In the Garden of Eden,” as interpreted through…LSD. Then some say it refers to the Bhagavad Gita. The most common explanation is that it was a lack of communication between band members and their headphones. However the song got its name, Jim is looking forward to sitting on his deserted island and rocking out to the classic guitar and bass riff, or ostinato.

Show #53 - 12.02.06
Greg's DIJ

It’s Greg’s turn this week to pop a quarter in the Desert Island Jukebox. With such great guests as Andy Summers on the show, Greg explains that he feels like the legendary BBC radio host John Peel. Mr. Peel had every band under the sun perform on his show up until his death in 2004. One the artists Mr. Peel embraced throughout her entire career was Polly Jean Harvey. John first had her on the show back in 1991 when she was only 20 years old and fresh from a sheep farm. Greg chooses a song from that original session entitled, “Sheela Na Gig” which has been compiled into a new album, PJ Harvey – The Peel Sessions 1991 – 2004. The title, “Sheila Na Gig,” is a reference to the Irish fertility goddess. The symbol was commonly represented in stone carvings. The meaning of the symbol is debated. Some argue it was meant as religious instruction to warn women from the sins of the flesh, while others argue it was meant to protect people from evil. In her song, PJ Harvey reworks the symbol’s misogynist meaning via a war of the sexes dialogue which turns the symbol’s negative denotation upside down.

Show #51 - 11.18.06
Jim's DIJ

It is Jim’s turn to drop a song into the Desert Island Jukebox, and he wants listeners to hear some “freak folk” that is truly freaky. He chooses to add “The Minotaur’s Song,” by the Incredible String Band. This ‘60s folk act played at Woodstock, but, as Jim explains, was too freaky to be included in the movie. Like Bert Jansch, band members Mike Heron and Robin Williamson fused Scottish and Celtic folk music with Eastern European drones and the newer folk music of people like Bob Dylan. The Incredible String Band also had an incredible lifestyle, and that too affected their sound. Jim thinks that freak and folk never combined so well, and that’s why he’s going to bring it with him to the desert island this week.

Show #50 - 11.11.06
Greg's DIJ

Greg is choosing not to hold Sir Elton’s recent bad behavior against him. He wants to think back to a kindler, gentler time when John wasn’t just a diva, but also wrote good songs. One such song is “Where to Now St. Peter,” off of the Tumbleweeds Connection album, and Greg adds it to the Desert Island Jukebox this week. He thinks Tumbleweeds Connection is John and writing partner Bernie Taupin’s strongest beginning to end concept album, as opposed to the commonly named Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy. Greg explains that both men were at the top of their games: Taupin at conjuring up the “Wild West” in his lyrics and John at composing great songs, as opposed to great outfits.

Show #49 - 11.04.06
Jim's DIJ

A couple of classic rock reunions made the news recently. First was Black Sabbath sans Ozzy Osbourne. The second was Genesis sans Peter Gabriel. Jim is a self-professed “prog rock nerd” and wanted take turn dropping a tune into the Desert Island Jukebox as an opportunity to defend Genesis, even in the days after Gabriel (and according to some, the band’s credibility) left. He goes with “One for the Vine,” which our host explains may have been written by Tony Banks as a companion to “Salsbury Hill,” written by his Gabriel, his friend and former band mate. Jim believes the song is about a messianic leader who brings his people into a war fought in his name, and then gets pulled up into heaven…or something like that. Regardless of its content, Jim thinks it’s a beautiful song. Greg scoffs, but you be the judge.

Show #44 - 09.30.06
Greg's DIJ

While the remaining members of The Who appear to be looking forward, Greg decided to look back for this week’s Desert Island Jukebox pick. He went with what he believes to be the ultimate Who track—“I Can See For Miles.” This track, which was the only Who song to have cracked the U.S. top ten chart, perfect encapsulates what the band were about. Although all its members—Roger Daltry, Pete Townshend, John Entwhistle and Keith Moon—were integral to the group, it was Townshend’s arranging that really allowed each member to shine. It was Keith Moon’s drumming that was really the lead instrument, and despite being the chief songwriter and guitar player, Townshend knew enough to showcase that rhythm. This relationship is highlighted in “I Can See For Miles,” and therefore Greg wants to take it with him to that eternal desert island.

Show #42 - 09.16.06
Jim and Greg's DIJ

This week listeners get a rare treat—double Desert Island Jukebox picks. Both Jim and Greg pick their favorite drum tracks. Jim goes first and explains that if you asked any drummer to pick out his favorite, they’d most likely point to John Bonham of Led Zeppelin. Bonham is known for his amazing power, but Jim notes that he is also remarkably subtle and soulful. This is particularly evident in the song “Dancing Days.” During the song, listen to where Jim points out what makes Bonham so special. And then check out his own drumming abilities.

Greg moves away from the rock arena for his pick. He loves soul, R&B and funk drumming, specifically that heard in James Brown’s music. Brown doesn’t ask everyone to “give the drummer some” for nothing. You’ll hear that command, not one, but six times, is “Cold Sweat.” Greg explains that the song also marks a turning point in Brown’s music where everything became focused on the groove. The horns, guitar, and even Brown’s voice mimicked the sound and rhythms of the drums. The drummer in this case is Clyde Stubblefield, who is one of the most sampled drummers in music history, and for good reason. Stubblefield’s drum solo in “Cold Sweat,” is not just rhythmic, but melodic, and is one of the only drum solos that you can actually dance to. And for that reason, Greg takes it with him to the desert island.

Show #40 - 09.02.06
Jim's DIJ

In true rock and roll style, Jim makes an cheeky Desert Island Jukebox this week. As discussed above, this week marks the one year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. So, many people would have gone with a solemn, or even political track. But, as listeners know, Jim is not many people, and he can’t resist choosing R.E.M.’sIt’s the End of the World As We Know It (And I Feel Fine)”. Jim likens the Dadaist song to Bob Dylan’s “Subterranean Homesick Blues,” which has a similar surreal expression of social discontent. The song also comes from REM’s pre-major label era, which Jim believes is their best time period. He also offers bit of insight into one of the song’s most famous lines: “Leonid Brezhnev, Lenny Bruce and Lester Bangs. Birthday party, cheesecake, jelly bean, boom!” Jim wrote the biography of rock critic Lester Bangs, and learned that this line was written after Michael Stipe and Peter Buck attended Bangs’ birthday party. Hungry and poor, the young band members were hoping to get a meal out of the event, but were only offered birthday cake and jelly beans. Then an over-served Bangs insulted his fan Stipe and started a food fight. Make sense now?

Show #38 - 08.19.06
Greg's DIJ

Both of the albums reviewed this week claim to draw inspiration from the music of the ‘30s and ‘40s, though Greg is not quite sure what music the men of Outkast and Christina Aguilera are hearing. He decides to step away from their rather cartoony depictions of the era and put some of the real thing into the Desert Island Jukebox this week. “Strange Fruit,” by Billie Holiday has exactly the kind of authentic sound these contemporary artists should be striving for. The song began as a poem that Jewish schoolteacher Abel Meeropol wrote after witnessing a photograph of a man being lynched in the South. (Meerepol is also known for having adopted the orphaned children of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg. The writer brought the song to Holiday at one of New York’s only integrated night clubs. Holiday’s label refused to record the song, the singer insisted on performing it and went to a specialty label instead. The song has became an anthem for the anti-lynching movement and is thought of as one of the great protest songs of the century, but Greg wants listeners to pay attention to the performance as well. While Holiday certainly had the chops to trill as good as any pop diva, the singer restrains herself and opts for a more understated tone, making the lyrics even more chilling. She not only can sing, but knows how to sing. For this reason, Greg is going to take “Strangefruit” to the desert island.

Show #37 - 08.12.06
Jim and Greg's DIJ

Last week Arthur Lee, the singer and guitarist for the psychedelic rock band Love, died of leukemia at the age of 61. Jim and Greg explain how Lee was one of the most important figures of the psychedelic era. He influenced bands like The Doors, The Byrds, and even the other great African-American psychedelic rocker of the day—Jimi Hendrix. His masterpiece, Forever Changes, also influenced contemporary “orchestral pop” artists like The Arcade Fire and The Polyphonic Spree. Lee was a pioneer, but was largely unheralded. This may have been the musician’s own doing, since he was a rather dark, eccentric figure. But, while Lee certainly had many troubled years, Jim and Greg believe his music deserves to be celebrated. Therefore, to pay tribune to Arthur Lee, our hosts choose to highlight a song off his great album, Forever Changes. They both add “The Red Telephone” to the Desert Island Jukebox.

Show #36 - 08.05.06
Greg's DIJ

Greg wraps up the show in true Sound Opinions style by picking a classic MTV moment for his Desert Island Jukebox pick. He highlights “Where Did You Sleep Last Night,” which Nirvana performed live as part of MTV’s Unplugged series. If Greg had to choose a single performance by the band, it would be this one. The late Kurt Cobain pours his heart and soul into it, and the band’s backing is incredibly empathetic. Of course, Cobain did not pen this tune. It was originally recorded as “In the Pines” in the late 1930s, and Jim and Greg discussion its evolution as part of a conversation with cyberlaw and free culture guru Lawrence Lessig. Check out those footnotes and listen to a montage of its many incarnations.

Show #35 - 07.29.06
Jim's DIJ

In order to remove the bad taste left by the New York Dolls recent showing, Jim decides to return to a happier time for this week’s Desert Island Jukebox pick. Even after the Dolls broke up, lead singer David Johansen never failed to deliver. This was particularly the case live, as Jim found out after attending a 1982 show (illegally). The then underage critic was mesmerized by Johansen’s energetic performance of songs like this week’s DIJ track, “Frenchette.” While most of the Dolls songs were short, classic punk tunes, “Frenchette” clocks in at over five minutes and is more in tune with the stadium anthems of the era. The song is a witty play on the notion of something being not quite what it should be: not love, but lovette; not leather, but leatherette; not French, but frenchette. The song was written by Johansen and fellow Doll Sylvain Sylvain. This proves that the two men were capable of doing great work post-Dolls, prompting Jim to wonder why they can’t create the same magic today. Therefore, both Jim and Greg put an open invitation out there for the Dolls to come in and get some medicine from the rock doctors.

Show #34 - 07.22.06
Greg's DIJ

As a nod to Peaches’ irreverent, gender-bending ways, Greg digs deep down in his music collection for this week’s Desert Island Jukebox. He chooses a track by ‘70s and ‘80s model/pop star/diva Grace Jones. Before Peaches, or even Madonna, shocked and awed people with their controversial lyrics and style, Grace Jones was crossing lines between genders and musical genres. She was beautiful, but also masculine. Her music was rock, but also disco. So, like David Bowie, Jones had audiences questioning the idea of identity. But, it wasn’t until she collaborated with Island Records founder Chris Blackwell and his Compass Point (house band that she made music that could be taken seriously. Greg chooses to play her cover of Joy Division’s song “She’s Lost Control.” In Jones’ version, she assumes the role of the woman on the verge of a losing her mind. And after listening to the song, you may find that this role wasn’t such a stretch.

Show #33 - 07.15.06
Jim's DIJ

Just as Rhymefest was inspired by The Strokes song “Someday,” which he sampled in his track “Devil’s Pie,” Jim too was inspired to choose it as his Desert Island Jukebox song. While the Strokes don’t have a typical hip hop sound, Jim explains that their rhythms, which echo a New York subway train, have a very hip hop beat and momentum. The man largely responsible for that sound is drummer Fabrizio Moretti, who Jim admires for being a masterful, simplistic drummer, if not for a few other reasons.

Show #32 - 07.08.06
Greg's DIJ

All girl indie rock group Sleater-Kinney recently announced that following their performance at Lollapalooza this year, they’d be taking an indefinite hiatus. Essentially, this means that the Portland group is breaking up, but reserving the right to reunite should they be inspired (or in debt). Sleater-Kinney is one of Greg’s favorite groups. He loves all seven of the group’s albums, but thinks they really hit their stride on their third effort, Dig Me Out. This is because singer/guitarists Corin Tucker and Carrie Brownstein were joined by powerful drummer Janet Weiss. Also, there’s an inherent tension in the music, which Greg imagines was caused by the demise of Tucker and Brownstein’s romantic relationship. So, to say goodbye, Greg is choosing the title track, “Dig Me Out,” as his Desert Island Jukebox pick this week.

Show #30 - 06.24.06
Jim's DIJ

Jim’s Desert Island Jukebox pick this week is inspired by his conversation with Thom Yorke and Jonny Greenwood of Radiohead. The band uses live performances as opportunities to explore and expand tracks they work on in the studio. This reminds Jim of the touring tactics of another great British band—Pink Floyd. They too would road-test songs for months at a time before taking them to the studio. And the result is similar. Both Radiohead and Pink Floyd are simultaneously experimental, avant-garde and also successful and mainstream—a rare thing in the music industry. So, the track Jim decides to adds to the jukebox is one Pink Floyd experimented with live, then later recorded in a different format. The song fans know as “Sheep” from their 1977 album Animals, was originally performed live as “Raving and Drooling.” Listen to the studio version, then compare it to this rare DIJ pick.

Show #27 - 06.03.06
Greg's DIJ

Taking his inspiration from the earlier discussion with Ernesto Lechner, Greg chooses Beck’sTropicalia” as his Desert Island Jukebox pick. The notion that people were ever jailed or sent into exile for playing Tropicalia music in Brazil got this host all fired up. Especially because this music, pioneered by artists like Caetano Veloso and Gilberto Gil, has remained such a formative influence on contemporary artists. Beck displays his love for the tropicalistas in this song from his 1998 album Mutations (a nod to fellow Brazilians Os Mutantes). Beck combines the Bossa Nova chords and gentle singing of Tropicalia music with art rock guitar and synthesizer. The result is a perfect example of Beck’s pop collage style and a perfect homage to his Brazilian heroes.

Show #26 - 05.27.06
Jim's DIJ

Jim’s drops a coin in the Desert Island Jukebox this week which features a Twin Cities rock band. Before they were the Jayhawks, Gary Louris, Marc Perlman and Mark Olson backed up a fellow Minnesota singer named Lori Wray. While Wray has not achieved a lot of success outside of Minneapolis/St. Paul, He explains that she adds a Lulu-like 60s pop sensibility to her singing, making her voice perfect for heartbreak tunes like his DIJ pick, “True Love in a Day.”

Show #25 - 05.20.06
Greg's DIJ

It is Greg’s turn to pop a quarter into the Desert Island Jukebox, but this week he had a hard time choosing just one song. According to our host, hip hop star Missy Elliott is the top singles artist of the last 10 years. Along with producers like Timbaland, she makes truly avant-garde music, but does so in a really fun, accessible way. Therefore, it’s no wonder that her songs are hits critically and commercially. For this week’s show, Greg went with the song “Work It.” The song demonstrates Missy’s novel approach to sounds and words. It isn’t really about anything new, but the lyrics, beats and sounds (note the elephant’s wail) couldn’t sound fresher. In fact, only Missy Elliott could get away with having the hook to a Top 40 hit be sung backwards. So, you may not be able to sing along to this week’s DIJ, but you’ll certainly want to.

Show #24 - 05.13.06
Jim's DIJ

The opportunity to play Desert Island DJ goes to Jim this week. Inspired by his earlier discussion with Eddie Argos from Art Brut, Jim chooses a song by Jonathan Richman and the Modern Lovers to add to the Desert Island Jukebox. The Modern Lovers, who were hugely influenced by the Velvet Underground, would all go on to be a part of great projects: David Robinson started drumming for The Cars, Jerry Harrison played keyboards with the Talking Heads, and Ernie Brooks went on to play with a number of bands, including Rhys Chatham’s guitar army which was discussed a few weeks ago. Richman took some bizarre turns, promising to only play music fit for a baby’s ear, but the band’s 1976 self-titled debut remains a masterpiece, according to Jim. He understands why Argos was so inspired by Richman’s songwriting. Both men salute the “everyman dweeb” who struggle with getting girls and getting respect. While “Roadrunner” is perhaps the band’s best known song, Jim decides to go with “She Cracked” as this week’s DIJ pick.

Show #23 - 05.06.06
Greg's DIJ

Greg’s gets to add a track to the Desert Island Jukebox this week. His choice was inspired by the passing of Phil Walden. Walden was a major figure in the southern rock scene, and co-founded Capricorn Records, home to The Allman Brothers and Charlie Daniels Band. Greg, however, will remember Walden as the man instrumental in propelling the career of soul singer Otis Redding. He was Redding’s manager up until the singer’s tragic plane crash in 1967, and helped expand his career into the mainstream. One savvy decision was to put Otis Redding and all of the key Stax Records players on the road in Europe in the summer of 1967. The competition between Redding and Stax acts like Sam & Dave fueled the performer’s fire. The result was a high energy, high-impact performance the one he gave of “Can’t Turn You Loose”—this week’s DIJ pick.

Show #21 - 04.22.06
Jim's DIJ

This week it is Mr. DeRogatis’ turn to drop a quarter in the DIJ. He ties the show up nicely with his selection from the band Dumptruck. One of Dumptruck’s founders, Kirk Swan, played with Steve Wynn during the segment. He and his partner, Seth Tiven, put out their debut album, D is for Dumptruck, in 1994 and were very influenced by what Paisley Underground bands like The Dream Syndicate were doing on the west coast. Dumptruck incorporated more folk rock and power pop into their music, however, and were also influenced by Big Star, Fairport Convention (who also count Greg Kot and Sound Opinions guest Colin Meloy as fans), and the band Television. Like Dumptruck, Television was also comprised of two guitarists and vocalists—Tom Verlaine and Richard Lloyd. Jim explains that other than Television, he has never seen two guitarists work so well together as they did in Dumptruck. A great example of this is Jim’s DIJ pick—“Alive.”

Show #19 - 04.08.06
Greg's DIJ

This week Mr. Kot makes a Desert Island Jukebox pick. He chooses “Fever” by Peggy Lee. Fever is a rare example of a white singer covering a song by a black artist and actually bringing something positive to it. “Fever” was originally recorded by Little Willie John. Greg points out that Peggy Lee is the last person you’d imagine covering a testosterone-fueled R&B song like “Fever,” but she certainly was up to the task.

Show #13 - 02.25.06
Jim's DIJ

Jim picks a song to add to the Desert Island Jukebox this week. All that talk about Canada got him thinking about one of his favorite bands—Rush. This band might not always get a lot of respect, but Jim believes they gave virtuoso prog rock performances. He chooses not to go with one of Rush’s epic songs, which could take up half a show, and instead picks a track called “Trees.” This song, released on the band’s 1978 album Hemispheres, tells the story of a battle of the wills between maples trees and oak trees. If that doesn’t convince you of the band’s greatness, listen for drummer Neal Peart’s woodblock solo!

Show #12 - 02.18.06
Greg's DIJ

Greg’s DIJ selection this week was inspired by his discussion with Professor Lawrence Lessig. Thinking about fair use, free culture and digital copyright law got this rock critic downright nostalgic for the days when great art was using other people’s art. “Eggman” by the Beastie Boys is a perfect example of this. The song was released Paul’s Boutique, the hip hop trio’s follow-up to their successful, albeit frat boy-ish, debut License to Ill. The group linked up with production team The Dust Brothers to create a sonic collage of samples, beats, loops and raps. In “Eggman” alone astute listeners can hear parts of “Superfly,” and “Bring the Noise,” bits of dialogue from “Taxi Driver,” and E.T., as well as the film scores to Jaws and Psycho. Sadly, shortly following the release of Paul’s Boutique, a series of lawsuits made sampling on this level too risky and too cost-prohibitive. Listening to “Eggman” is enough to send a music fan into mourning.

Show #10 - 02.04.06
Jim's DIJ

This week Jim gets to choose a Desert Island Jukebox track. He brings the show full circle by choosing a song by another witty British pop group—The Kinks. “David Watts” is a song where Ray Davies sneers at Watts, a member of the English upper-crust. Davies takes the gentleman to task for being too gentle. But, one shouldn’t be too quick to label the songwriter a homophobe, however. His 1970 hit song “Lola” was a loving portrait of a transvestite. Whatever the lyrics are about, “David Watts” is a great sing-along song. And we encourage all the Sound Opinions listeners to do so.

Show #9 - 01.28.06
Greg's DIJ

Greg gets to pop a quarter into the Desert Island Jukebox this week, and his choice is Sandy Denny’s cover of “I’ll Keep it With Mine” by fellow folk rocker, Bob Dylan. Greg explains that Denny is best known for her appearance on the Lord of the Rings-inspired Led Zeppelin track “The Battle of Evermore.” That’s a shame, according to Greg. In addition to her work British folk-pop outfit Fairport Convention, Denny composed and performed many great solo songs, including this week’s DIJ.

Show #8 - 01.21.06
Jim's DIJ

This week, it’s Jim’s turn to pick a Desert Island Jukebox track. He goes with “Acknowledge” by Chicago punk band Screeching Weasel. For Jim, Screeching Weasel is key to understanding the current pop/punk explosion of bands like Blink 182, Sum 41 and fellow Chicagoans Fall Out Boy. In addition, this band has one of the most highly documented histories in rock. A few years ago Ben “Weasel” Foster put highly autobiographical novel that alludes to his time in the band. Recently, his Weasel partner John Jughead Pierson released his fictional response called Weasels in a Box. Despite their great influence on rock, many people have not heard of the band. One of the reasons for this, Jim notes, is that Foster suffered from agoraphobia, preventing the band from doing a lot of touring. They were highly prolific, however, and recorded almost an album a year for 13 years. “Acknowledge,” was released on Screeching Weasel’s last album before disbanding. In the song, both Weasels sing about agoraphobia and substance abuse, but without losing their punk rock sense of humor or catchy, Ramones-style 3-chord structure. It’s this combination, according to Jim, that makes Screeching Weasel one of the best bands Chicago has ever produced.

Show #7 - 01.14.06
Greg's DIJ

This week it is Greg’s turn to choose a song for the Desert Island Jukebox. He goes back to the period during the late 70s and early 80s when rock and dance music merged. This period has been referenced a lot during discussions of contemporary bands like Franz Ferdinand and LCD Soundsystem. For his pick, Greg goes to one of the sources—ESG. This South Bronx group, made up of four sisters, worked with Martin Hannnett, best known as the producer of Joy Division. While not skilled musicians, the Scroggins Sisters had a unique sound that greatly influenced house and post-punk bands. Their track “UFO” is actually one of the most heavily sampled songs in music history. But for his DIJ, Greg chooses to play “Moody,” which is both atmospheric and danceable. Listen for the conga solo by the sisters’ friend Tito.

Show #6 - 01.07.06
Jim's DIJ

Jim puts the quarter in the Desert Island Jukebox this week. His pick is the Rolling Stone’s track, “2000 Man off their 1967 album Their Satanic Majesties. Jim chose this song after watching Wes Anderson’s Bottle Rocket, which features it during the climax of the movie. Many people overlook t his album, however, which was made during a hectic time for the Stones. The band was being criticized for appearing like they were trying to imitate their chief competetor. In addition both Brian Jones and Keith Richards were busted for drug possession during the making of the album, which Ian Stewart refers to as “That damn Satanic Majesties.” The Stones fallibility here is what Jim likes though. For him, the album holds up better than later, more well-received records, and “2000 Man” is something he’d love to see live.  

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Show #5 - 12.31.05
Greg's DIJ

Greg Kot’s DIJ selection for this week is “A Woman Needs to be Loved” by Tyrone Davis. Greg notes that three great soul singers died in 2005; Eugene Record, Luther Vandross, and Tyrone Davis, with Tyrone being the most overlooked and versatile of the three. Greg points out that you can hear the resentment and pain in Tyrone's voice, over the knowledge that he was wrong, and this pain, sets this track aside as the standout in his discography.

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Show #3 - 12.17.05
Jim's DIJ

Jim’s Desert Island Jukebox pick for this week is “Mink Coat” by Plasticland. The song is one of many psychedelic tracks found on Children of Nuggets: Original Artyfacts from the Second Psychedelic Era - 1976-1996. This Rhino compilation is one of many Nuggets installments, the first being the 2 vinyl set compiled by Lenny Kaye in 1972. While there are some gems on the most recent collection, it is pretty much a mess according to Jim, a huge fan of the psychedelic genre. “Mink Dress” is one of the standout tracks. Plasticland was started by Glen Rehse and John Frankovic in Milwaukee in the 80s. Despite their Midwestern roots, Rehse and Frankovic were drawn to the colorful 60s era British Psychedelia . Their song follows in the tradition of “Arnold Layne” by the Syd Barrett-era Pink Floyd and explores the songwriter’s fascination with women’s clothing—in this case, a mink dress.

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Show #1 - 12.03.05
Greg's DIJ



This week, Greg dropped a quarter in the Desert Island Jukebox, and brought the heavy lumber. His choice, was Gloria Jones's, Tainted Love. That's right, Gloria Jones, not Soft Cell. Soft Cell covered this "Northern Soul" classic, and received loads of cash and airplay, but this version is where it all started. Greg also blew Jim's mind, when he told Jim that Gloria was the wife of Marc Bolan, of T-Rex fame. Bolan died in a car crash, and Gloria was the driver in the car.

Greg Kot's Desert Island Jukebox pick: Tainted Love by Gloria Jones


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