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Sound Opinions, being the scholarly work it is, has provided footnotes to help you navigate through the show's vast maze of musical knowledge.

Because, let's face it—sometimes even we have no idea what the heck Jim and Greg are talking about.
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02-01-08 Footnotes
Show 114: Powerhouse Sound, Van Hunt & Vampire Weekend Reviews, Jim’s DIJ pick
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1 Nielsen Soundscan recently announced a 15% drop in total album sales, and a 19% drop in physical album sales in 2007. It’s fair to assume that CDs are on their way out, but Wall Street Journal Online columnist Jason Fry wonders if the album itself will follow suit. He talks to Jim and Greg about changing listening patterns in the digital age as well as alternatives. Consumers have become disillusioned by CDs, and may start to only want singles. Jim notes that this would be a return to the dawn of rock, when singles were king. He suggests that the album might stick around though—it will just be composed by playlist-makers rather than record companies. Jason adds that musicians might be well-served to follow the advice of Mark Cuban. The multi-media mogul recommends artists release series of songs rather whole albums.

2 This week Jim and Greg welcomed Powerhouse Sound, a veritable who’s who of avant jazz and rock musicians. Ken Vandermark, world-renowned reeds player and MacArthur Genius grant winner, assembled this bi-coastal motley crew to experiment with fusing jazz, rock, funk, blues and reggae. With him on the U.S. side of this project is bass player Nate McBride, as well as drummer John Herndon and guitarist Jeff Parker of the group Tortoise. The group has a new album out comprised of recordings done both here and in Norway entitled Oslo/Chicago Breaks.

3 Ken explains to Jim and Greg that the idea for Powerhouse Sound was inspired by Miles Davis’ experiments with blending jazz and popular music. In the 1970’s, Davis began working with a diverse group of musicians to create an improvisational sound that is as much funk as it is jazz. Greg notes that this was a heavily controversial period for Davis; jazz purists saw it as a commercial sell out. But, like Davis, the members of Powerhouse Sound are not interested in boundaries and musical dogma. The sound is the key. You can hear this freedom in their performance of “Shocklee/Broken Numbers.” Check out the piece in its entirety here.

4 The first album up for review this week is Popular by soul singer Van Hunt. Jim and Greg both received their review copies, and were excited to talk about the album on the air. Then, they saw a post on Van Hunt’s blog. The singer announced that he had been cut from the Blue Note roster and wasn’t sure if the album would ever see the light of day. Both Jim and Greg agree that this is a shame. Jim admits that Van Hunt isn’t reinventing the wheel, but he borrows from all the right places. He thinks the singer has great style and great taste and loves this record to pieces. Greg calls the album lean and sparse, and says that it will be jarring to most R&B fans. But, he hears more of Van Hunt himself in this album, rather than just Prince and Sly Stone. Both Jim and Greg urge listeners to seek the music out online, and if they could give it a Buy It, they would.

5 Next up is the self-titled debut from quartet Vampire Weekend. The indie rockers have been getting a lot of buzz for months now after releasing an EP. Now, with the release of their new album, they’re being referred to as the next big indie stars. But, both Jim and Greg disagree with the hype—Greg feels it’s unfair, and Jim feels it’s completely unwarranted. He hates this album and finds it to be pretentious both musically and lyrically. He explains that the Paul Simon-esque African rhythms feel contrived, and the mentions of Louis Vuitton, Benetton and Oxford Commas are more prep than they are punk. Greg disagrees and says the music has clean guitars, rhythms and a sense of humor. It’s a perfectly pleasant pop record that’s a victim of hype.

6 Jim gets to add a track to the Desert Island Jukebox this week, and he decided to pick a song from an art school band that got it right. The Talking Heads were the originators of this style, and their song “Life During Wartime,” is one of the first times they incorporated African rhythms and instruments into their New Wave sound. There are layers of percussion and a funky bass line, but the lyrics also deserve to be highlighted. Many listeners probably know the song as a catchy pop track, but it’s also got a heavy message about race riots and a society in trouble.



Songs Featured in Show #114

Blue Oyster Cult, “(Don’t Fear the) The Reaper,” Agents of Fortune, 1976 (0:16)
Powerhouse Sound, “2-1-75 (for Miles Davis),” Oslo/Chicago: Breaks, 2007 (0:15)
Miles Davis, “On the Corner/New York Girl/Thinking of One Thing,” On the Corner, 1972
Powerhouse Sound, “Shocklee/Broken Numbers,” 2008 Live in Studio
Powerhouse Sound, “Old Dictionary (for Bernie Worrell),” Oslo/Chicago: Breaks, 2007
Powerhouse Sound, “King to Crown pt 1 to Acid Scratch pt. 2” Oslo/Chicago: Breaks, 2007
Curtis Mayfield, “Freddie’s Dead,” Superfly, 1976
Powerhouse Sound, “Coxonne,” Oslo/Chicago: Breaks, 2007
Van Hunt, “In the Southern Shade,” Popular, 2008
Van Hunt, “Turn My TV On,” Popular, 2008
Vampire Weekend, “Cape Cod Kwassa Kwassa,” Vampire Weekend, 2008
Vampire Weekend, “A-Punk,” Vampire Weekend, 2008
Vampire Weekend, “One (Blake's Got a New Face),” Vampire Weekend, 2008
Talking Heads, “Life During Wartime,” Fear of Music, 1979
Yeasayer, “Sunrise,” All Hour Symbals, 2007
Abba, “Ring Ring,” Ring Ring, 1973
Led Zeppelin, “Out on the Tiles,” Led Zeppelin III, 1979
Tony Joe White, “Polk Salad Annie,” Black and White, 1969
Spearhead, “Red Beans and Rice,” Home, 1994 (0:19)
Cibo Matto, “White Pepper Ice Cream,” Viva! La Woman, 1996
Aphex Twin, “Logan Rock Witch,” Richard D. James Album, 1996


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