Sound Opinions
Contact
Reviews
Events
Donate
About
Listen
See
Read
  
  
Sound Opinions, being the scholarly work it is, has provided footnotes to help you navigate through the show's vast maze of musical knowledge.

Because, let's face it—sometimes even we have no idea what the heck Jim and Greg are talking about.
Songs featured in this episode
Join the Mailing List
Contact Us

 


10-03-08 Footnotes
Show 149: Psychedlic Soul Genre Dissection, Reviews of Jenny Lewis and Lou Reed

Listen to the MP3 Stream of this show: (link)
Download the Podcast: (Download the MP3)

1 Often when Jim and Greg discuss RIAA lawsuits in the news, the stories seem to paint a dreary picture for the average music fan. But this week things are looking up for the little guy. Last year Jammie Thomas was convicted of music piracy in the country’s first file-sharing trial. But, now the judge is asking for a new trial. U.S. District Judge Michael J. Davis believes he didn’t instruct the jury properly and didn’t insist that the prosecution prove files were actually downloaded. In addition, he thinks the $220,000 fine is completely excessive. The judge is also urging for better copyright laws, something Jim and Greg have been saying for years.

2 The consumer does not fare as well in the next news story. Both Wal-Mart and Yahoo! Music have announced that customers who purchased music with DRM protection will not be able access their purchases for mush longer. In Yahoo’s case, it is because their music store, and consequently their DRM server, is shutting down. And, while Wal-Mart was wise to eliminate DRM files, Jim and Greg don’t understand why customers who purchased songs prior to this shift should penalized. For every step forward in the digital music industry, there are at least two steps back.

3 Jim and Greg next give their takes on the recent My Bloody Valentine reunion show. The influential U.K. band played Chicago as part of their first tour in 16 years, and both Jim and Greg were there to witness it, though one has to wonder if they saw the same show. Both critics agree that the band’s 1991 album Loveless was a masterpiece, but Jim wished they had played some new material. He also didn’t see evidence that the band has kept up with the times, calling their dated loops and samples cheesy. Greg was much more impressed and thinks the members of MBV deserve one free pass in terms of not having new material. He was also blown away by their sound—almost literally.

4 Next up Jim and Greg check into the “Psychedelic Shack” for a discussion of Psychedelic Soul music. One of the architects of the genre, Norman Whitfield, passed away recently, so Jim and Greg thought his sound warranted more discussion. As a songwriter and producer, Whitfield helped escort The Temptations from their Motown sound, to one that was much funkier and rock-inspired. As Greg explains Whitfield wanted to “out-Sly Sly.” By Sly he is of course referring to Sly and the Family Stone, who along with Jimi Hendrix, are the pillars of the early Psychedelic Soul movement. For a full taste of the genre, Jim and Greg recommend checking out the following artists:

The Temptations
Sly and the Family Stone
Jimi Hendrix
War
George Clinton
Isley Brothers
De La Soul
Digital Underground
Dr. Octagon
Gnarls Barkley

5 After releasing a successful solo debut, Jenny Lewis is back with a new album called Acid Tongue. While the first album was something of an accident, this one is much more thought out, with a cast of famous helpers including Elvis Costello, Chris Robinson and She & Him. Jim could’ve done without some of their appearances, but loves this record “to pieces.” He explains that Lewis tries out a variety of styles, but all the songs are linked by an emphasis on strong vocals and natural recording. Greg completely agrees. He is less sour than Jim on Lewis’ other project, but thinks that on her own she’s made another two much better albums. Acid Tongue gets two Buy Its.

6 Twenty-five years after releasing the original version of Berlin, Lou Reed is back with a live version, as well as a film recording. Back in 1973, the record was almost universally panned, but Jim and Greg both believe that it deserves a second look, and this live album is the perfect way to do it. Greg describes the songs as harrowing, but also beautiful. It’s not an easy album to listen to, but Reed brings his old songs new empathy. He gives it a Buy It rating. Jim thinks fans are better off purchasing this album than the first one, especially when you consider that Berlin 1973 wasn’t recorded very well. He also gives Berlin: Live at St. Ann's Warehouse a Buy It.



Songs Featured in Show #149
Journey, “Don’t Stop Believing,” Escape, 1981
The Eagles, “Business As Usual,” Long Road Out of Eden, 2007
My Bloody Valentine, “Only Shallow,” Loveless, 1991
The Temptations, “Ball of Confusion,” Greatest Hits Volume 2, 1970
Jimi Hendrix, “Fire,” Are You Experienced, 1967
Sly and the Family Stone, “I Want to Take You Higher,” Stand!, 1969
The Temptations, “Psychedelic Shack,” Psychedelic Shack, 1970
Bill Cosby, "Hooray for the Salvation Army Band," Hooray for the Salvation Army Band!, 1968
Funkadelic, "Maggot Brain," Maggot Brain, 1971
Funkadelic, "Wars of Armegeddon," Maggot Brain, 1971
Funkadelic, "Hit It and Quit It," Maggot Brain, 1971
The Isley Brothers, "That Lady (Part 1 & 2)," 3 + 3, 1973
War, "Spill the Wine," The Best of War and More, 1991
Prince, "Rasberry Beret," Around the World in a Day, 1985
Dr. Octagon, "Blue Flowers," Dr. Octagonecologyst, 1996
Outkast, "B.O.B.," Stankonia, 2000
Gnarls Barkley, "Crazy," St. Elsewhere, 2006
Jenny Lewis, "Acid Tongue," Acid Tongue, 2008
Jenny Lewis, "Jack Killed Mom," Acid Tongue, 2008
Jenny Lewis, "Black Sand," Acid Tongue, 2008
Lou Reed, "How Do You Think It Feels," Berlin: Live at St. Ann's Warehouse, 2008
Lou Reed, "Sad Song," Berlin: Live at St. Ann's Warehouse, 2008
I Am Robot And Proud, "Island Life," Uphill City, 2008
Dengue Fever, "Tiger Phone Card," Venus on Earth, 2008
Joan as Police Woman, "Hard White Wall," To Survive, 2008
Metallica, “Battery,” Master of Puppets, 1986
Danzig, “Dirty Black Summer,” Dirty Black Summer, 1992


Site Map

Main Page

The Staff / Record Reviews / Message Board / Desert Island Jukebox / Audio
About Sound Opinions / Photos / Links / Mailing List

  Contact Us
888.859.1800